The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 273, No. 22, December 31

A New Giant Sucking Sound : CHINA IS TAKING AWAY MEXICO'S JOBS, AS GLOBALIZATION ENTERS A FATEFUL NEW STAGE
The "giant sucking sound" Ross Perot used to talk about is back, only this time it is not Mexico sucking away American jobs. It is China sucking away Mexico's jobs. And jobs from Taiwan and South Korea, Singapore and Thailand, Central and South America,...
Bush's Domestic War
The American people, argued President Bush in his weekly radio address on December 8, "want action on an agenda of economic growth, energy independence, patients' rights, education, faith-based legislation--all of which are important issues that are...
Cuban Embargo-Buster?
During the week of December 17, US freighters are expected to dock in Cuban ports and begin offloading a historic shipment of foodstuffs. In a deal worth up to $30 million, the Castro government has purchased wheat, corn, soybeans, rice and flour and...
Labor: In Fighting Trim
The September 11 attacks spread their pall over the AFL-CIO convention in early December as union representatives touchingly remembered the dead--including 631 union members--and honored the everyday heroism of workers like firefighters, ironworkers...
Naming-And Un-Naming-Names
Two months after the September 11 attacks, the American Council of Trustees and Alumni (ACTA), an academic watchdog group founded by Lynne Cheney, issued a report grandly titled "Defending Civilization: How Our Universities Are Failing America and...
National Security?
Toward the end of the futile British colonial war in Cyprus in the late 1950s, the great Labour leader Aneurin Bevan got up in the House of Commons and asked the Tory government directly: Did they want a base in Cyprus? Or all of Cyprus as a base?...
Oregon Rains on Ashcroft
Portland Things are quieting down here in Terror Town, and it's probably been days since a talk-show host has denounced Portland's leaders as politically correct, latte-loving traitors. Although city leaders said that local police would not conduct...
Pennies in the Hat
As fate would have it, the very first holiday card to show up in my mailbox was from the Freedom From Religion Foundation, of which I am a devoted member and fan. It carried the witty and timely message, "Reason's Greetings." Now more than ever! Just...
The Eurocrush on Books
It's too early to tell what the long-range effects will be on the American economy of September's disastrous events--certainly the short-term effects have not been salutary. And the recession we had been fearing is now officially declared. We can be...
The Guns of Kabul : UNLESS THE NUMBER OF ARMS IS REDUCED DRAMATICALLY, PEACE IS UNLIKELY TO HOLD
Even as the main fighting in Afghanistan appears to be winding down, a two-decade-long flow of weapons into the country is picking up steam. Starting in October the United States began dropping arms to the so-called Northern Alliance by air, and in...
The Hersh Paradox
No journalist has made more of a splash since September 11 than Seymour Hersh. Writing in The New Yorker, he has scored a string of scoops--about a Delta Force mission gone awry, corruption in the Saudi royal family, the vulnerability of Pakistan's...
The UN: Bush's Newest Ally? IT'S PROVEN USEFUL OF LATE IN AFGHANISTAN, BUT ANNAN SHOULDN'T EXPECT MIRACLES
On December 10 Secretary General Kofi Annan and the United Nations were awarded the Centennial Nobel Peace Prize. The citation commends Annan for "bringing new life to the organization," and it expresses the hope that the UN will serve "at the forefront"...
WHERE ARE THE WOMEN? Debating Afghanistan's Future
Brussels Sima Wali, president and CEO of Refugee Women in Development and driving force behind the Afghan Women's Summit, originally envisioned the event as a way to promote women's involvement in the peace process in Afghanistan--an ambitious strategy...