The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 248, No. 5, February 6

1789 and All That: Dancing on the Grave of Revolution
Long live the Revolution -as long as it is dead and buried with no prospect of resurrection. That thought springs to mind as the French begin to celebrate the bicentennial of their Great Revolution. The program is most impressive. Books and documents...
36 Fillette
To appreciate how well Catherine Breillat has succeeded with 36 Fillette, her merciless, clearheaded comedy of sexual initiation, it helps to see Dangerous Liaisons as well. On one side, a contemporary, low-budget French production, enlivened by...
A Hungarian Fairy Tale
At its core, the film is a satire about a curious Hungarian law: Any child born without a legal father is officially issued the name of a fictitious one. In this way, the child is spared the embarrassment of being called a bastard, only to discover,...
Bob Lekachman
Economics is said to be the "dismal" science. How then to account for the often hilarious, always perceptive, never dismal prose of economist Robert Lekachman, who died January 14 after a long struggle with cancer? He was a teacher, author and...
Every Time I Say Goodbye, I Die a Little
Every Time I Say Goodbye, I Die a Little I paid my adieux to Ron in this column a couple of weeks ago, but it's hard not to wrench out the sob-sodden kerchief for one last wave. As Reagan heads west twenty-six months after the Contragate scandal...
Get Tough
Imagine that the following group took over the government: an elected official who had passed confidential information to a foreign power; a businessman who once 'oined in a secret venture with a dictator; a diplomat who covertly and unofficially...
Government by Tabloid: No Gays, Please, We're British
Something" nasty is brewing in Britain. The government, beset by racial and economic tensions, has now turned its attention to homosexuals. At Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's imstigation last spring, Parliament enacted Clause 28 of the Local...
Heart of Darkness Department
Iran, whose leaders take ideology as seriously as Shamir, has somewhat dropped out of the news since the halt in the I ran-Iraq war. The situation there is ghastly. Estimates vary but a number of sources report that 1,000 to 5,000 political prisoners...
Hero of the 1970s
Our contribution to the current 1970s craze (certified by periodicals ranging from Business Week to The Village Voice) is to salute a worthy but forgotten figure of that decade, Fred Harris. Harris is an apostate from the respectable center. Elected...
'I Do Not Choose to Run': Raising Issues, Hope and Hell
Jim Hightower, the Texas Commissioner of Agriculture, has emerged as a national leader of the loose alliance of populist and progressive forces -based in cities, suburbs and farmlands - that became a critical component of Democratic Party politics...
No Pragmatist at Heart
The one thing you could say about Shamir is that unlike the Bush gang he is not a pragmatist. These days the US. press is touting the line that Shamir might be, in the last analysis, flexible. This is nonsense. Shamir, like the old I.R.A. men...
Shamir to School Kids: Drop Dead
K Shamir to School Kids: Drop Dead Back in the late spring of last year Jane Serling-Boyd was talking to her second-grade Hebrew class at the Beth El synagogue in Durham, North Carolina, about the situation in Israel and the occupied territories....
The Case of the Bugged Senator
Did the National Security Agency listen in on the phone conversation of a U.S. senator? Margaret Newsham, a former employee of Lockheed and the N.S.A., says yes. Last summer, she told Representative Louis Stokes, then chair of the House Intelligence...
The C.I.A. Explosive: Did It Blow Up Flight 103?
When E. Lawrence Barcella Jr. heard about the explosion of Pan American Flight 103, he immediately thought of Edwin Wilson, the Central Intelligence Agency's infamous renegade. In particular, Barcella, the former Assistant U.S. Attorney who tracked...
The Legacy of Lydda: Four Decades of Blood Vengeance
George Habash is now head of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, but in 1948 he was just a young man who had recently completed his medical studies in Beirut. I was a platoon commander of the 82d Regiment of the Israeli Army brigade...
The North Case
The recent dismissal of the conspiracy and fraud charges against Oliver North should result in a fairer trial for North and make the job of special prosecutor Lawrence Walsh a good deal easier. At the same time, it raises serious questions about...
Voices of Sarafina!
Voices of Sarafina!, a documentary by Nigel Noble, presents boisterous musical numbers from the Broadway show and sober interviews with the young men and women who make up the cast. Conceived by the writer, director and composer Mbongeni Ngema, Saraftna!...