The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 240, April 27

Minority Report
In Isabel Allende's impressive new novel, The House of the Spirits, which is set in a barely fictional Chile, one of the best-drawn characters is a certain Esteban Trueba. Trueba is a grandee--a brawling, egotistical landowner and an almost likable...
No to the Contras
Ronald Reagan is right that the Congressional vote on funds for his contras is a vote for peace. But it's the No vote that carries hope of restoring peace to the region Reagan has bloodied with war. The $14 million more the administration is asking...
Protest on Campus
On election night, hardly six months ago, rhythmic cries of "Four more years!" rose from the campus of Columbia University when Ronald Reagan's re-election was confirmed. Now that jubilant conservatism seems suddenly reversed. Hundreds of students...
Technology out of Control
Last December, a toxic cloud escaping from a Union Carbide pesticide plant brought death to at least 2,500 residents of the shantytowns crowding its edges. The alchemy that overnight transformed the Indian city of Bhopal into a gas chamber injured...
The 1985 Biennial Exhibition
Silenus the satyr famously said that the best good for man is never to have come into being, and the next best is to go out of it as early as possible. I was reminded of Silenus' gloomy wisdom as I confronted the individual works in the Whitney Museum's...
Uncivil Liberties
I think it would be fair to say that I was in the Napa Valley recently as a wine consultant. Yes, I'm aware that you didn't realize I knew anything about wine. You have been under the impression that when it comes to my feeding habits I might be just...
Welcome Reversal
Last month the American Civil Liberties Union notified its affiliates that it now opposes a 1984 law tightening Central Intelligence Agency secrecy -- a law it was instrumental in getting passed. The organization's board reversed its position after...
Whose Technology?
The disaster at Bhopal brought to world attention immensely important issues which had been buried in academic discourse or obscure political debate. Suddenly it was urgent--even proper--to raise questions not only about technological safety and security...