The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 265, No. 9, September 29

Al Checchi: The Ross Perot of CA
Gazing out of his suite of offices over the La Brea tar pits and toward the Pacific horizon, 48-year-old entrepreneur Al Checchi (pronounced CHECK-ee) knows very well that only 1 percent or so of Californians have heard of him. No problem. No reason...
A Self-Made Hero
What's wrong with this picture? A man of mature years (Jean-Louis Trintignant, as it happens) squints into a sun whose warmth seems to butter his face. He speaks comfortably, confiding to the camera almost as if he were addressing the glow. His subject?...
Big Apples Bites Liberalism
In a decade already marked by disaster for liberal Democrats, the likely re-election this November of New York City's Republican Mayor, Rudolph Giuliani, carries a special sting. Elsewhere in the country, seismic shifts like suburbanization and declining...
Cracker
I am worried. Billions of brain cells left? I think I traded in a block of them a hazy while back. As for giving eight hours a day, maybe some of us will consider lending out our REM cycles, as if inviting an artist-in-residence to stay for a while....
Dharma and Greg
I am worried. Billions of brain cells left? I think I traded in a block of them a hazy while back. As for giving eight hours a day, maybe some of us will consider lending out our REM cycles, as if inviting an artist-in-residence to stay for a while....
Ending Economic Apartheid: Is Labor Capitalism Risking the Legacy of South Africa's Liberation Struggle?
On an April evening almost exactly three years to the day after South Africans voted Nelson Mandela into power, you could watch, at a black-tie dinner in Johannesburg, the dynamics of South African power relations change before your eyes. The dinner...
English Uber Alles
As one more aftershock to the anti-immigrant Prop 187 and anti-affirmative action Prop 209, another divisive ballot initiative is bubbling its way up through the fissures of California's political topography. Called "English for the Children," this...
Fast Track to Nowhere: Clinton's New Free-Trade Talk Is but an Early Skirmish in a Human Rights Battle
The White House and much of the press paint the debate over "fast track" trade authority that opened in Congress a few weeks ago as a contrast between the future and the past, between free trade and protectionism, between the dynamic sectors of the...
Feeding the North Korea Myths
Eight years have passed since the Berlin wall fell, but the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is still standing. (Among the obvious suspects in 1989, why this one?) Two long-running myths have underpinned almost all news about North Korea since...
Four Poems and a Funeral
On Labor Day, as the railings of Buckingham Palace were being transformed into an impromptu Wailing Wall of kitsch, a CNN reporter faced the cameras. Up to his thorax in posies and wreaths and cards, he held a piece of paper in his hand. It was, he...
NASA Nuclear Roulette: The Cassini Mission's Plutonium Peril
These views on why NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn should be scrubbed are from two branches of the scientific community. The first, by Helen Caldicott, a physician well-known for her opposition to nuclear power, was refused by major newspapers. The...
Nothing Sacred
I am worried. Billions of brain cells left? I think I traded in a block of them a hazy while back. As for giving eight hours a day, maybe some of us will consider lending out our REM cycles, as if inviting an artist-in-residence to stay for a while....
Russia's Port-a-Nukes
Aleksandr Lebed, former secretary of Boris Yeltsin's Security Council, told 60 Minutes on September 7 that more than a hundred "nuclear suitcases," or highly portable bombs, in Russia are missing. His claim immediately reminded me of one of my favorite...
Sunset over Britain
Freedom of expression, which ranks about nineteenth on the European list of human rights, may have been crippled for a generation or two in the crash that claimed Dodi Fayed and Diana, Princess of Wales. It was an Englishman who wrote about first...
The End of Economics?
Just a few months ago, every drop in the unemployment rate sent a shudder through Wall Street. Good news for workers was bad news for stocks. Why? Because, as the press always reported, more jobs meant soon-to-be-rising inflation. An iron law, the...
Thoroughly Modern Di
Whatever else it may or may not be, the death of Princess Diana was a godsend for pundits. After a summer widely bemoaned as newsless, in which Op-Editorializers were forced to treat the bite Mike Tyson took out of Evander Holyfield's ear with a level...
Throne & Altar
In an obsequious week that saw the concept of sainthood thrown about like confetti, the bizarre thing was the subliminal association, in the media mind, of the figures of Diana Spencer and Agnes Bojaxhiu, "Mother Teresa." Early film footage of the...
Up in Smoke?
It was only a few months ago that regulation of the nation's tobacco conglomerates seemed in sight, after a fifty-year crawl. But now it's go-slow season in Washington on the public-health liability settlement proposed in June between Big Tobacco...
Why Rudy Reigns: Crime Pays for New York's mayor(Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, New York, New York)(Cover Story)
It's a sparklingly beautiful day in New York City. Crowds line Fifth Avenue, equipped with coolers, folding chairs and rainbow flags. Marching bands stamp nervously, revelers come rollerblading by in a whoosh and at 12:15 the twenty-eighth annual...