The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 265, No. 4, July 28

4 Little Girls
Now in her 40s, the woman can still recall the interrupted ball game. She and her friends were in the yard, starting to mark out a playing field, when one of the kids saw a dead bird in the grass. Kick it aside, the others said. No, said the little...
An Ear for an Ear
During the Middle Ages, there were a number of recorded instances in which animals--mad dogs, rampaging bulls and swarming locusts--were prosecuted for various crimes and misdemeanors. In 1474 in the city of Bale, a raucously deep-throated hen, apparently...
Bosnian Camps: A Barbed Tale
On August 5, 1992, Penny Marshall and cameraman Jeremy Irvin of ITN, Ian Williams of Britain's Channel 4 and Ed Vulliamy of The Guardian talked their way into Bosnian Serbain concentration camps at Omarska and Trnopolje. What they filmed and wrote...
Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde
Paula Vogel's How I Learned to Drive (Century Theater) and Moises Kaufman's Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde (Minetta Lane Theater) are ingenious, shoestring, actor-driven productions. Both study sex that is shamine and irresistible...
How I Learned to Drive
Paula Vogel's How I Learned to Drive (Century Theater) and Moises Kaufman's Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde (Minetta Lane Theater) are ingenious, shoestring, actor-driven productions. Both study sex that is shamine and irresistible...
Mexico's Morning After: From Beatings in the Streets to a Beating at the Polls: Will the PRI Learn a Lesson?
Victor Hugo Campos Linas lives and works on a quiet block in 20 de Noviembre, a middle-class neighborhood not far from the Mexico City airport. A 56-year-old father of four, he is the owner of a bustling little shop that sells construction supplies....
National Security Crisis
Ever since the cold war ended, Congress and the President have been creating official commissions to determine the best way to reorganize America's national security apparatus to meet the conditions we now face. Almost every one of these nUmerous...
N. Ireland's Sad March
"The least worst outcome" is how a leaked British Northern Ireland Office document described its decision to allow a Protestant march on July 6 by the Orange Order down Garvaghy Road through the Catholic neighborhood of Portadown. But the outcome...
No More Fiesta of Bullets; until Now, Mexicans Have Been Limited to Being Either Spectators or Victims
The question "Who are you voting for?" never existed before in Mexico. Since 1930, elections have not been an integral part of Mexico's political life, except that of its politicians. "Nothing is going to change." In Mexico at last, the rules of the...
Privatizing War: How Affairs of State Are Outsourced to Corporations beyond Public Control
The history of American foreign and military policy abounds with deception and scandal, with shadowy actors, monied interests and efforts to keep the public out of what are properly public decisions. Now those efforts have taken an unprecedented turn...
Sky TV
We asked a conservative friend who thinks highly of Pat Robertson to elucidate Rupert Murdoch's recent move into Christian broadcasting. He responded with this open letter. Dear Pat--Another Fine Mess. I see by the papers that "Murdoch Agrees to...
Tales of Mr. Tod
I arrived in England not long after the Union Jack was hauled down in Hong Kong, with the empire now reduced from the 400 million inhabiting a third of the planet in 1897 to some 172,200 souls today, in tiny dependencies like Pitcairn Island (population...
The Able Judge
In his July 2 opinion in Able v. Perry, Judge Eugene Nickerson of the Eastern District of New York struck down the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays as unconstitutional on equal protection and First Amendment grounds. If affirmed on...