The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 265, No. 22, December 29

Double-Crossing Pols
What Washington needs is a few honest political donors like James Allen Cartrette. He understands how the system works, and won't let politicians off the hook if they double-cross him. When the Governor of North Carolina snubbed his bid for a political...
Kyoto's Political Science
It was political science, not physical science, that reigned at the international convention on global warming in Kyoto, Japan. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a group of hundreds of climate scientists reporting to the United Nations,...
Lies and Spies
A year ago, in its issue dated December 9, 1996, Time ran a big story, flagged on its cover as "Israel Prepares for War," about fears of a Syrian attack on the Golan Heights in the fall of that year. The supposed crisis began in August 1996, when...
Nuclear Misdirective
In November, President Clinton secretly signed new guidelines on the use of nuclear weapons. Although it was the first such revision in sixteen years and the Presidential Decision Directive altered guidelines set by Ronald Reagan in 1981, in every...
Of Race and Risk
Several years ago, at a moment when I was particularly tired of the unstable lifestyle that academic careers sometimes require, I surprised myself and bought a real house. Because the house was in a state other than the one where I was living at the...
Race on Screen and Off
One week before Steven Spielberg opened his historical film Amistad -- recounting the horrors of the Middle Passage, the bravery of rebellious African captives on the slave ship La Amistad in 1838 and the principles of the New England abolitionists...
Universities Press On
In 1878, only 400 years after Oxford University first put its imprint on books, the United States joined the university press ranks. Johns Hopkins, the first American university to model itself on the German research institutions, made it a priority...
When Gephardt Speaks
Recently President Clinton's men bestirred themselves from the torpor of the second-term White House to strike out at a clear and present danger: Richard Gephardt, leader of the House Democrats. White House senior adviser Rahm Emanuel was ready to...