The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 269, No. 18, November 29

A Shark in the Mind of One Contemplating Wilderness
A shark swims past me in a kelp forest that sways back and forth with the current. It is deliberate and focused. I watch the shark's sleek body dart left and right as its caudal fin propels it forward. Its eyes seem to slice through the water in a...
As Maine Goes
Campaign finance reformers are celebrating a major victory in Maine, where a federal district court just upheld the constitutionality of that state's pathbreaking Clean Election Act of 1996. The Maine decision comes on the heels of an important announcement...
Bland Art in Every Pot
In 1989, after several years of controversy, legal wrangling and numerous public forums, Richard Serra's sculptural installation Tilted Arc was removed from a federal plaza in New York City by the US government's General Services Administration (GSA),...
Emperor of the Air - Berlusconi Owns Italian Politics, but He Wants More
If you combined the political roles of Republican front-runner George W. Bush and Senate majority leader Trent Lott, the media power of Ted Turner and Rupert Murdoch, the money of Ross Perot and Steve Forbes, and the real estate and personal arrogance...
Fighting the Art Bullies
New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani has created enormous consternation and publicity in his attempts to censor an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Although he suffered public rebuke recently in federal court, where his conduct was deemed...
Flag-Waving at the Whitney
The American Century: Art and Culture, Part II, 1950-2000 The Triumph of the New York School, a deeply ironic painting by the American artist Mark Tansey, looks at first sight like a rotogravure depiction of a military surrender that took place...
Genocide and the Body-Baggers
During the Kosovo war, Serbia's only remote sympathizer within NATO was the government of Greece, which is joined to Belgrade by many common ties of history, geography and Christian Orthodoxy. The Serbian official in charge of Kosovo, a certain Mr....
GLOBAL MEDIA Moguls and Then There Were Nine
Michael Eisner, Disney Annual revenues: $23 billion (FY 1998) Non-US sales: 21% Non-US sales in 1984: 8.4% Disney has established a strong presence in China, Japan, Europe and Latin America. Its ESPN International is broadcast in twenty-one...
Globo Politics - Brazil's Media Powerhouse Seeks New Life in Latin America
Sao Paulo In the waning days of the 1994 presidential campaign, Brazil's leftist challenger took to wearing a beanie topped by a little model satellite dish. Candidate Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva wasn't vying for the comedy vote. He wanted to dramatize...
Hate Crimes Legislation
Do hate crimes laws privilege some victims over others? As the debate heats up in the wake of a string of ghastly crimes (the murder of Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr., the mass shootings in Los Angeles and Illinois), opponents of proposed state...
Indonesian Improvisation - Independent Radio's New Voice Rises
Armed militias had forced most journalists to flee from East Timor by September 7, the day then-President B.J. Habibie and General Wiranto of Indonesia declared martial law for the region. But reports out of Dili were still airing on Radio 68H, a loose...
Innocents Abroad
A Moment of Innocence * DOGMA When people label a film "great," the usual effect is to close off a discussion that ought to be opening. But when the film was made in Western Asia, cheaply and under threat of censorship, by a guy with so marketable...
It's a Small World of Big Conglomerates
The nineties have been a typical fin de siecle decade in at least one important respect: The realm of media is on the brink of a profound transformation. Whereas previously media systems were primarily national, in the past few years a global commercial-media...
Manufacturing Dissent - the New South African Media's Growing Pains
It is a measure of the South African government's success in reforming its apartheid-era media that its critics now have plenty of places to voice their complaints. In the last days of the apartheid regime, there were thirty radio stations-twenty-four...
Media Globalopoly
In October at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing to consider the antitrust implications of Viacom's purchase of CBS, Senator Paul Wellstone pointed out that in 1983 about fifty conglomerates controlled more than half of all broadcast and other media...
Media, Inside out - How Independent Journalism Can Survive Globalization
The recent CBS-Viacom-bination-at $37 billion, the largest media deal ever-mirrored previous purchases, like Disney's acquisition of Capital Cities/ABC and Time Warner's taking of Turner Broadcasting. Despite its unprecedented size, the CBS-Viacom...
Mexico's 'Election'
Mexico City The first-ever presidential primary sponsored by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) was not, as the New York Times put it, "a historic advance toward democracy in Mexico" but simply business as usual for the world's oldest ruling...
Microsoft's Fatal Error
Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's factual findings in United States v. Microsoft, released November 5, spell the doom of Microsoft as we have known it. Forget what you hear about "might change on appeal." Judge Jackson's legal conclusions, which he hasn't...
Publish, Then Perish - in Iran, Newspapers Rile the Establishment
In today's Iran, newspapers make as much news as they break. Over the past two years, for almost every new paper championing reform that has made it into print, another one has been shut down. The debate over the press in Iran reflects the interplay...
Seoul's Celluloid Soul - Korea's Local Film Quota Has Hollywood Hopping Mad
Under pressure from the United States during negotiations over the bilateral investment treaty (BIT) last December, South Korea's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade announced the gradual dissolution of the country's screen-quota system, which at...
South Africa Says, Yizo Yizo! with Postapartheid TV, a Country Writes Its Own Future
Zinhle and Lebogang are two 15-year-old schoolgirls from Soweto. Unlike their older siblings who were on the barricades in the eighties, they are postapartheid city kids, their style defined more by African- American ghetto fashion and by kwaito-the...
The Cable Guise - When Communism Crashed, HBO Rewrote the Rules
Ten years ago, as Hungary was roiling with democratic protests, the country had two television channels, both controlled by the state. But in October 1989, for the first time, news crews accustomed to filming the droning monologues of Communist officials...
The Insider Outs Tobacco
On screen and off, the tobacco industry is still up to its old rotten tricks. In November the Michael Mann/Disney docudrama, The Insider, was launched in the United States to robust reviews. The film chronicles the tribulations of Jeffrey Wigand, the...
The Presidential Aptitude Test
The fuss over George W. Bush's flunking a snap quiz on foreign affairs stimulated meditations about uninformed candidates and gotcha journalism on the editorial pages. We think an Allan Bloom-type list of things a President should know isn't a bad...
Tiny Television - against the Odds, Pirate TV Banishes Barriers
It's been nearly a decade since the collapse of Communism showed that running a dictatorship takes, among other things, lots of bandwidth. When any political system implodes, frequencies become available. Across the former Communist countries, people...
War of Words - When the Bombs Came, Serbia's B92 Hit the Net
In May 1989 a small group of radio and newspaper journalists and media activists from Belgrade took over a small room in Central Belgrade that the Central Committee of the Yugoslav Communist Party had once used as a storage room. We cleared out the...
Who Owns the Movies?
The major Hollywood studios, all but one owned by the nine mega- conglomerates, make more than half of their money outside the United States. Here are the top four movies in selected countries, with ownership information. Country Films Country Film...
Who Owns the Music?
Overseas sales of US recording artists are declining, but the media giants are establishing subsidiaries around the world to produce and distribute local music. Here are the top four recording artists in selected countries, with ownership information....