The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 266, No. 21, June 8

A Modest Proposal: Sue the Bastards!
When California's major gubernatorial candidates held their first debate on May 13 in Los Angeles, none of the three network-owned and operated affiliates (O&Os) bothered to broadcast the event. Among the other four local TV stations, only one...
'Bringing Down the Barriers'
Debates over the cost-versus-return economics of news have racked America's commercial networks since the inception of TV newscasts. But only recently, because of takeovers by corporations inexperienced with, or hostile to, responsible journalism,...
Field Guide to Lobbyists
EDWARD FRITTS Took over as C.E.O. of the National Association of Broadcasters in 1982, when the trade group's lobbying was so ineffective that Senator Bob Packwood told delegates at its annual convention that "you can't lobby your way out of a...
Following the Money
TELECOM'S BIG BUCKS With deregulation still on the Congressional agenda, telecom companies have been pumping money into Washington. In 1997 alone, the Baby Bells and three major long-distance carriers spent more than $30 million on donations to...
Fox in the Cow Barn
It was supposed to be unlike anything at any local station anywhere. A "dream team" of investigative reporters to tackle hometown issues with the backing of Rupert Murdoch's Fox Television, which now owns and operates more TV stations than any other...
Free TV Speech for Candidates
WHEN IT COMES TO A KEY ELEMENT IN CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM, BROADCASTERS PLEAD THE PUBLIC INTEREST, BUT THEY'RE REALLY TALKING ABOUT THE BOTTOM LINE. We own the airwaves. We, the public. Not G.E., not Disney, not CBS and not Rupert Murdoch. But we...
Getting a Movement Moving
What do media activists do when they mobilize against TV trash--and nobody comes? There was Dr. Paul Klite and his Rocky Mountain Media Watch acting up in Boulder last year against obsessive local TV news coverage of murdered JonBenet Ramsey. They...
His Biggest Takeover: How Murdoch Bought Washington
THE AUSTRALIAN TAB-TV MOGUL BELIEVES BIG GOVERNMENT WORKS--FOR HIM. TO INSURE THAT IT DOES HE RUNS A SLICK, WELL-FUNDED LOBBYING MACHINE IN THE CAPITAL. Rupert Murdoch is a busy man with little time to hobnob with politicians. But in late February,...
His Way
Frank Sinatra, who died May 14 at 82, wasn't always a Republican. In 1945, when he was thin and 30, he won a special Academy Award for The House I Live In, a short film in which he told a gang of street-comer kids that racial and religious differences...
Indonesia's 'Disappeared'
On May 20, as rumors flew that General Suharto was about to step down and protesters showed no sign of accepting his promises of "transition," tanks rolled through the capital and top military men flaunted their power. This week Allan Nairn begins a...
New Voices in Cyberspace: The Net Could Become a Vibrant Alternative to the Media Oligopoly. the Message to Progressives Is Clear: Don't Whine, Go Online!
THE NET COULD BECOME A VIBRANT ALTERNATIVE TO THE MEDIA OLIGOPOLY. THE MESSAGE TO PROGRESSIVES IS CLEAR: DON'T WHINE, GO ONLINE! As the Murdochs and Bertelsmanns of the world continue their drive to swallow one another and everything in between,...
Of Love and Bile
Readers of this special issue of The Nation are unlikely to be surprised to hear that television is a buck-grubbing business. That the same people who own it also own everything else. That they commune with their mystical parts by the medium of advertising...
Rappin' with Bulworth
If the medium is the message, what better medium than rap music--at least when the message concerns the bitterness of race relations, the media, money as the drug of choice in politics and developing the gangsta guts to tell it like it is? That's...
Stabs, Front and Back
When Robert Oppenheimer felt the annihilating heat and blast of the first nuclear detonation at Alamogordo, New Mexico, in 19,45, he found himself saying: "I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." The invocation is taken from the Bhagavad-Gita,...
Stories TV Doesn't Tell
We're at a point in history, says George Gerbner, a professor at Temple University, when most of our culture's stories are told not by parents, schools, churches or community members with something to tell-but by global media conglomerates with something...
Taking Back the People's Air: Revive the Public Interest Doctrine - Now That We Need It More Than Ever
REVIVE THE PUBLIC INTEREST DOCTRINE--NOW THAT WE NEED IT MORE THAN EVER. Broadcasters who complain that they shouldn't be burdened with any more public service obligations can trace the source of their troubles back to Herbert Hoover. It was...
The Exterminators
Today we are blessed with a diversity of broadcast and cable services that stretches the imagination. Yet with the exception of dramatic series, very few would say that the creativity and inventiveness of what we watch is expanding to match the quantity...
The Public Interest
In this special issue, the fourth on the National Entertainment State, we look at a concept that may seem as dated as a black-and-white documentary narrated by Edward R. Murrow: that of television and the public interest. In the current market-besotted...
TV: The Nature of the Beast
Say out loud that something's missing from the culture of TV, and you will surely hear some version of the following: "But look at all those cable channels!" It's a naive response, since it mistakes mere quantity (so many units there on sale!) for...