The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 280, No. 6, February 14

Battling the Pentagon
On issues of war and peace, progressives should take heart from the fact that no matter how aggressive the Bush Administration's intentions may be, its ability to carry them out is likely to be severely circumscribed in a second term. In the wake...
Chertoff and Torture
Back on Friday, June 12, 2002, the Defense Department had a big problem: Its new policy on torture of captives in the "war on terror" was about to be exposed. John Walker Lindh, the young Californian captured in Afghanistan in December 2001 and touted...
Dick Durbin: Bush Fighter
When Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla Owen, perhaps George Bush's most corporately compromised judicial nominee, appeared early in 2003 before the Senate Judiciary Committee, the most devastating line of questioning she faced did not come from...
Fantasy Island
Washington Post writer Paul Farhi cleverly compared the content and structure of George W. Bush's second inaugural address to The Rascals' classic ditty "People Got to Be Free." It worked, but a better title for the speech might have been borrowed...
'Freedom' Belongs to All
George W. Bush's second inaugural address cynically invoked noble ideals for ignoble ends. In the course of twenty minutes, Bush used the words "free," "freedom" and "liberty" no fewer than forty-nine times. Freedom lies at the heart of American political...
Hail-to-the-Chief Show
This Administration may not know how to rule the world, but it sure can run a ritual. No President in recent history has been so adept at using pageantry to invest a radical new agenda with the authority of the past. Yet there is always a moment in...
Models of Opposition
George W. Bush's hopes of launching his second term with a new Secretary of State in place and a new Attorney General very nearly so were dashed when the two senior Democrats in the Senate decided not to go along. Senator Robert Byrd, the dean of the...
Shrieking Violets
There I was, in the basement of the Margaret Mitchell House in Atlanta, enjoying a private tour of the place. (I was there pushing my great new book, Open House: Of Family, Friends, Food, Piano Lessons and the Search for a Room of My Own, just out...
Visualizing a Neo-Rainbow: History Holds Clues to a Winning Electoral Strategy for Progressives
In 2004 the winner-take-all system of US electoral politics again proved an obstacle to genuine democracy. While progressives found little to get excited about in the John Kerry campaign, there were no viable third-party candidates, leaving them without...
Waxman: Democrats' Eliot Ness: His Headline-Grabbing Investigations Are Enough to Give the GOP Heartburn
It's nothing new, says Representative Henry Waxman. For decades--literally--this Democrat from the Westside of Los Angeles has mounted high-profile investigations and hearings while churning out sharp-edged reports: on toxic emissions, the tobacco...