The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 279, No. 14, November 1

Anchors Aweigh: The Refs Are Worked
At the opening of the Democratic convention, long before Dan Rather put a big bull's-eye on his back, Harvard's Joan Shorenstein Center for the Press, Politics and Public Policy hosted Rather, Peter Jennings and Tom Brokaw, together with Jim Lehrer...
Campaigner in Chief
As he began his seventh campaign swing this year through the battleground state of Wisconsin on a sunny day in late September, George W. Bush loaded a secret weapon onto his bus: Dr. Britt Kolar, a physician who played on the Yale rugby team with Bush...
Climate, the Absent Issue
Every once in a while there is good news in this troubled world, and the choice of Kenyan environmentalist Wangari Maathai as this year's Nobel Peace Prizewinner is one such moment. The timing could not be more apt. The choice of Maathai was announced...
Dissent at 50
In the summer of 1953, the New School for Social Research hung a yellow curtain over a mural by the Mexican artist Jose Clemente Orozco. Orozco's transgression? He had included portraits of Lenin and Stalin in the work. In response to widespread criticism,...
Follow the Money: Bush Has Revived the Christian Right through Direct Federal Largesse
Five years ago the Christian right was in a tenuous position. Its standard-bearer, the Christian Coalition, was under investigation by the IRS and the Federal Election Commission, and many of its state chapters were nearing collapse. Its lead organizers...
Freeze-Out of the Arabists: The Neocons Have Isolated State Department Experts-With Disastrous Results
Ronald Schlicher is a senior official in the State Department's Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, an enclave for America's Arab specialists. He is the kind of Middle East expert who would presumably be in the vanguard of officials bound for Baghdad to...
Hammer Strikes-Out?
Has Tom DeLay--aka The Hammer--hit his last nail? Not yet, but the Republican House majority leader has sustained his own whacks recently for a series of unethical actions. Two reports by the House Ethics Committee outline several of the corrupt ways...
In the Cut
Moolaade * Vera Drake Throughout the four decades of his great career--which is the same thing as saying, throughout the history of filmmaking in sub-Saharan Africa--Ousmane Sembene has switched back and forth between urban and rural settings, historic...
Playing the Age Card
Alan Greenspan has recently been frightening Americans again, as he did in April, by threatening that Congress will have to cut Social Security benefits to fund retirement for "aging Boomers." In fact, the trust fund is solvent until 2042 and sloshing...
Presumed Innocent
Guantanamo: honor bound to defend freedom Unlike news reports, theater isn't expected to stick to the facts. By nature, the form is duplicitous, built on a sandy foundation of make-believe and pretense. Good documentary drama exploits its inherent...
Reforming Three Strikes
In November, California voters will have their first chance in a decade to reform the state's "three strikes and you're out" law, which has imposed cruel life sentences on thousands for relatively minor crimes like drug possession, shoplifting and...
Rocking the Cuban Vote: How an Anti-Bush Backlash Is Creating Divisions in Once-Monolithic Miami
This article is part of a series that looks at swing states, and swing constituencies, in the 2004 presidential election. --The Editors George W. Bush's brand of compassion doesn't please all of Florida's conservatives these days. The limited-Spanish-proficient...
Roe = Dred
Many viewers were puzzled when, toward the end of the second debate, George W. Bush answered a question about Supreme Court nominees by referring to the Dred Scott case. Why bring up the infamous 1857 decision, which declared that blacks could not...
Tarantara!
Twenty months ago, when the Bush Administration was steering the country toward war in Iraq, we noted a parallel with another military misadventure, the Spanish-American War, in which Cuba and the Philippines were both invaded [see "An Imperial Moment,"...
The Double Life of James Baker
When President Bush appointed former Secretary of State James Baker III as his envoy on Iraq's debt on December 5, 2003, he called Baker's job "a noble mission." At the time, there was widespread concern about whether Baker's extensive business dealings...
Vaccine Poker
With the announcement that 50 million influenza vaccines from the British manufacturer Chiron won't be available in the United States this year because of possible contamination, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has been put in a quandary, its...