The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 278, No. 13, April 5

A Vote for Honesty
Madrid It is a maxim of politics that people do not vote on foreign policy. But foreign policy became a domestic issue here on March 11, when the country was shaken by the early morning terrorist strikes on four Madrid commuter trains. The moment...
Blix Not Bombs
Before he left New York, Hans Blix had a poster on his apartment wall from the big antiwar demonstration in New York City a year ago on the eve of the attack on Iraq. "Blix Not Bombs," it proclaims. Blix, the former head of UNMOVIC, the United Nations...
Gay Marriage: Sidestep on Freedom's Path
I'm for anything that terrifies Democrats, outrages Republicans, upsets the apple cart. But exultation about the gay marriages cemented in San Francisco, counties in Oregon and New Mexico, and some cities in New York is misplaced Why rejoice when...
New School, Old Tricks
The New School University is one of Manhattan's most storied progressive institutions. But don't tell that to the people who work there. On March 11 several dozen students, labor organizers and faculty members gathered for a demonstration outside the...
Terror & Truth in Spain
The horrific bombings in Spain, which claimed more than 200 lives, were sad proof that terrorists can achieve success when their target is a government that has distanced itself from its people and pursued a misconceived counterterrorism policy. It...
The Battle over the Pledge
The loss of precision in spoken or written language is not, I suppose, the worst problem we face, compared with so many other distressing developments in our national life. But the consequences can include real political harm. Take, for example, a...
Three Mile Island
On the morning of September 11, 2001, after the second plane hit the World Trade Center and it was clear that the nation was under attack, US authorities issued an emergency alert, grounding air traffic and ordering nuclear power stations and other...
Trying Saddam
The capture of Saddam Hussein has raised the question of how best to hold him accountable for the horrendous human rights violations committed by his regime. The Bush Administration has come up with a proposal, approved in the form of a law adopted...
Uncommon Ground
A friend who lives in Paris forwarded me an item from the Internet, concerning a singles ad that had allegedly appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It read: "Single Black Female seeks male companionship. Ethnicity unimportant. I'm a very good-looking...
Whatever It Takes: Exxon Has Used the Legal System to Avoid Paying Damages for the Valdez Spill
Shortly after the catastrophic 1989 Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Exxon sent Don Cornett, the company's top official in Alaska at the time, to the fishing port of Cordova to reassure the fishers that the company would make things right....