National Catholic Reporter

The National Catholic Reporter is a Catholic newsweekly. It was founded in 1964 and is published 44 times a year by National Catholic Reporter Publishing Company Inc.Subjects include religion. The editor is Thomas Roberts.

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 23, April 9

An Activist's Decision, an Embarrassing Video
On Sunday, March 27, Chuck Colbert rose up during Mass at St. John the Evangelist Church in Canton, Mass., outside Boston, and loudly objected to an anti-gay marriage video that had been shown following the homily. In stories and newscasts that...
A Nice Jewish Girl Studying Catholicism?
Last May I had the privilege of being the only Jew to receive a master s degree in Catholic theology from Barry University, a Catholic university in Miami. What was a "nice Jewish girl" doing studying Catholic theology? Here is how I explained it to...
Bishop Untener Dies at 66; a Leadership Style That Bucked the Prevailing Wind
Bishop Kenneth Untener, who led the Saginaw, Mich., diocese for 24 years, was known for his intellectual rigor, simple lifestyle and deeply pastoral approach to leadership. He died March 27 at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Infirmary in Monroe, Mich.,...
Bucking Up the Catholic Brand
In a recent address at the Catholic University of America, pollster John Zogby sounded the alarms (NCR, March 21). "If so much of U.S. culture is focused on building brands among the young, it is worth considering how well the Catholic church performs...
Church Leaders Lobby for Poor at the White House
How significant is the voice of Christian churches in Washington? Important enough to get "face time" with National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice during a week in which she was responding to former terrorism czar Richard Clarke's accusations....
Economics Split Divides Notre Dame; Creation of Two Unequal Programs Decried by Some as Threat to Academic Freedom
The University of Notre Dame's economics department, long distinctive because of its commitment to social justice and other concerns considered out of the mainstream for university level programs, has been split into two separate but unequal bodies....
From Zero Tolerance to Iraq War, U.S. Ways Scrutinized
Last week I reported on a conference on canon law at Rome's Santa Croce University, where the U.S. bishops' norms for sexual abuse, and especially their "zero tolerance" policy, came in for criticism. As I noted, the norms aren't popular among canonists...
Immersed in the Desert: From the Craters of Nuclear Testing Grounds to the Las Vegas Strip, Students Find the Connections between Peace, Economic Justice and Care for the Earth
Five students set out from Berkeley, Calif., March 21 on spring break. But they weren't heading for the usual fun-in-the-sun hotspots. Instead they left for the Nevada Desert Experience "Immersion Program" that provides a firsthand experience of the...
In Sadness, Easter Morning
This issue is rich with the elements of the season. We mourn the death of a great--and that word is not used lightly--pastor, Bishop Kenneth Untener of Saginaw, Mich., but we recognize immediately the Easter morning in the sadness. Untener's Catholicism...
Parish Responds to Abuse Charge with Rite to Purify Church
On the first Sunday of Lent, Michael Sneesby said he experienced his personal resurrection. At Milwaukee's St. Augustine Church during a Feb. 29 healing service for those sexually abused by priests, Sneesby shed tears as Fr. Tom Wittliff, pastor,...
Place a Personal Ad and Trust the Universe
I was feeling high after a road trip to Clovis, N.M., where, flush with spring, I bought a $600 pair of cowboy boots for $150. "I think it's time for me to date again," I told my friend Sharon, as we drove in the dark back to Albuquerque. "Help me...
SOA Watch Scores Victory in Venezuela; President Chavez to Withdraw Officers from U.S. Army Training School
Ever since graduates of the School of the Americas were linked to the assassinations of six Salvadoran Jesuit priests in 1989, peace activists have worked tirelessly to shut down the military school at Fort Benning, Ga. Opponents of the school have...
Social Justice Focus at Risk, Says Professor
The decision to split economics at the university into two unequal bodies may jeopardize the department's longstanding focus on social justice, according to Jennifer Warlick, who now serves as the first chair of the new Economics and Policy Studies...
Students Opposed Department Changes
After Notre Dame's economics professors, no one was affected more directly by the splitting of the economics department than the university's graduate students. Having chosen the department for its distinctive focus, almost to a person, they publicly...
The Catholic Church Loses a Visionary
It might be easy for some in the, church to dismiss Bishop Kenneth Untener's tenure as an oddity. He was different the way saints can be different--so unusual that others excuse themselves from such lofty expectations. He could be dismissed, too--no...
The Hill of Crosses Suggests the Victory of Easter
It's just a little hill, a slight rise above the wheat fields of Siauliai, Lithuania. As hills go, it would hardly be memorable, except that it is crowned, studded, covered, with masses of crosses. There are tall, skillfully sculptured crucifixes....
Think Twice before Asking, 'Where's the Beef?' amid Mad Cow Disease Alarms, We Ignore the Greater Health Dangers Linking Meat to Top Three Killers of Americans
These are anxious days for meatheads. With each chomp into the flesh of a dead cow--in whatever form, from a cheap hamburger to a slab of sirloin--there is the unappetizing thought: Is this part of a mad cow? Will I die? With more than 30 countries...