National Catholic Reporter

The National Catholic Reporter is a Catholic newsweekly. It was founded in 1964 and is published 44 times a year by National Catholic Reporter Publishing Company Inc.Subjects include religion. The editor is Thomas Roberts.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 16, February 16

Artists View Cyberspace as Their Newest Canvas
Most of us who took an art history course in high school or college were probably taught the subject in a linear fashion. Art began with cave paintings and traveled in a narrow line through Egyptian, Greek, Roman, medieval and Renaissance European cultures,...
Atonement Friars Have Ecumenical Aims
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] NEW YORK -- Pain can be healed. Hatred can be turned to love. Division can be turned to unity. The church can and will be one. These simple yet weighty assumptions involve the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement Graymoor in a life's...
Catholic Vision Is Communal, Diverse: Focus on Papal Power Deprives Catholicism of Inherent Richness
Running through tonight's presentation is a concern that has been with the church from its very beginning, that is, how to maintain the identity of the church without suppressing legitimate diversity or without closing off its contacts with other faiths...
Guatemalans Cheer Pope, Cry for Peace: Bishops Present List of 77 Priests, Others for Study as Martyrs
GUATEMALA CITY -- Huge crowds welcomed Pope John Paul II to their conflict-weary country, hoping the pontiff would help to end 35 years of civil war. "He could make peace just by waving his hand," said Flor Munoz, a poor resident of Guatemala City,...
Habitat Builds Homes, Humanity in Peru
There were 16 of us -- four Roman Catholics, four Lutherans, two members of the United Church of Christ and six others a bit difficult to categorize. What brought us together was Peru. We were all part of a Habitat for Humanity Global Village Work Camp...
Initiative Would Raise Minimum Wage
SAN FRANCISCO -- First came the taxpayers' revolt, bringing conservative, middle-class suburbanites to the polls. Then came the backlash against immigrants and the drive to abolish affirmative action. Now a coalition of labor and community organizations...
Kateri Tekakwitha's Resistance Inspires Artist
"The Lily of the Mohawks" is an installation about political incorrectness. It is based upon the life of Kateri Tekakwitha, a Native American woman born in the Indian village of Ossernenon (now Auriesville, N.Y.), who lived from 1656 to 1680. Her mother...
Land Mines Great Killers of the Innocent: The United Nations Estimates That Up to 110 Million Mines in 64 Countries Could Explode at a Misstep
Apparently it was not a land mine that killed Sgt. 1st Class Donald Allen Dugan in Bosnia on Saturday. But it might have been. Millions of land mines (reports range from 3 million to 6 million) lie in wait where NATO peacekeeping forces will be roaming...
Lay Associates Flock to Religious Orders
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Thousands of women, and a smaller number of men, have joined U.S. religious communities in recent years. They are not vowed religious, whose numbers continue to dwindle. Laity are creating the new wave, linking themselves intentionally,...
Mary Grace Is Rector of Church in Suburbs
Recently my wife, Jean, and I went to the local funeral parlor to bid farewell to the father of a friend. There we found three clerical collars hovering near the coffin, helping the widow and comforting mourners with voices as soft as a baby's behind....
N.Y. Doctors Fight to Control Midwives: Mothers Ar Human Beings with Feelings, Not Bodies to Be Drugged, Cut, Stirruped or Sutured
Some New York City physicians are portraying themselves as champions of poor people, notably low-income women who give birth in delivery rooms of the city's 11 public hospitals. Nurse midwives, who do nearly a fourth of the births, have been the problem,...
Priests, Investors Coact on Tobacco Spinoff
Two organizations of religious men involved in antitobacco campaigns for ethical reasons have ended up in an unintentional alliance with a group of corporate shareholders from the RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp. The Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers and the...
Sisters Assemble and Renewal Continues
Back when nuns wore habits, it was easy to know their religious orders. But today, most Catholics readily identify communities of women religious by their ministries. Some sisters teach, others run hospitals. Some go to Latin America, others to Native...
Third Order 800 Years Old
Some laypeople affiliated with the Franciscans are associates or cojourners, with the type of relationship described on pages 12-15. Others are tertiaries or third-order secular Franciscans, with a different, more permanent relationship. In contrast,...
Tobacco Firms out to Spread Woe Worldwide
It is widely known that cigarettes lead to the deaths of some 500,000 people in the United States each year. According to estimates, tobacco use overseas, now rising quickly, kills another 2.5 million people worldwide each year. Health officials estimate...
U.S. Ready to Ratify Chemical Warfare Ban
In 1993 when President George Bush signed the Chemical Weapons Convention, the hope of the world was that finally the scourge of toxic chemical substances in the hands of terrorists or nations would come to an end. Alas, the U.S. Senate has not yet...
Vatican Has More Questions for Priest, Nun
The Vatican has broken its silence on an investigation of Fr. Robert Nugent and Sr. Jeannine Gramick and their teachings on homosexuality -- but only to request more information. In three questions, the Vatican has asked the priest and nun to further...
Windsock Tells Children When to Visit Monastery
Ss. Francis de Sales and Jane de Chantal founded the Visitation nuns in 1610 as a group of praying women who sometimes would go out to visit the sick and poor of Annecy, France. Only a few years later, the archbishop of Lyons pulled in their reins, insisting...