New Criterion

A magazine that publishes articles, notes and comment on cultural life in America. Publishes contributions from poets, authors, public policy scholars, humanities lecturers, and critics. Includes poetry, arts criticism, and commentary. Departments in thea

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 3, November

Antiquities True & False
Imagine a prestigious, hard-to-get-into art school full of fiercely competitive students who regard making art as a career choice as much as a creative necessity. Their course of study is designed to foster correct thinking, according to the dictates...
Being Blunt about Blunt
The Burlington Magazine, published in London, once bore a full title labeling it "for Connoisseurs." It advertises itself as "the world's leading monthly publication devoted to the fine and decorative arts." In January zoos it printed an article that,...
Buckley at the Beginning
National Review is now celebrating its fiftieth year of publication. It has been central to and helped shape the American conservative movement. It has also been a home to an astonishing array of talent, not all of it conservative--from Whittaker Chambers...
Earth to Stockholm
Quoth Harold Pinter: "I have no idea why they gave me the award." The award, of course, was the Nobel Prize for ... well, supposedly for literature. In the case of Harold Pinter, however, literature had nothing do with the prize. How could it? By our...
Freedom and Philanthropy
As regular readers of The New Criterion know, the magazine has from its founding been a beneficiary of the John M. Olin Foundation. As we noted in this space last year, the Olin Foundation, in accordance with the wishes of Mr. Olin, will be closing...
Gallery Chronicle
Gone are the days of "Must-See A.R.T." Today the art scene is Premium Cable On-Demand. In New York alone, there is a gallery for every man, woman, and child in the art world. Nobody can keep up with it; no one can see everything, nor, frankly, would...
Holmes & His Commentators
According to Hazlitt, if we wish to know the force of human genius, we have only to read Shakespeare, but if we wish to know the futility of human learning, we have only to read his commentators. Something similar might almost be said--almost, but...
Manicheanism a la Mode
Lately, I have been between spam filters and found that deleting junk e-mail one item at a time can sometimes be instructive. "You can get the watches you've dreamed about" reads the subject line of one of them, prompting the thought: Who the hell...
Maurice Cowling, 1926-2005
Maurice Cowling, who died in August, just short of eighty, was a politics and history Fellow of Peterhouse in Cambridge. Some university teachers are significant because they use their university as a base from which to address the world. Cowling,...
Science versus Scientism
On graduation from college I entered Yale Divinity School, not because I had decided to become a minister, but because of increasing doubts about the religious faith in which I had been reared. I supposed God had a purpose for my life, but I had no...