New Criterion

A magazine that publishes articles, notes and comment on cultural life in America. Publishes contributions from poets, authors, public policy scholars, humanities lecturers, and critics. Includes poetry, arts criticism, and commentary. Departments in thea

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 10, June

A Footnote on Ward Churchill
Who can forget Ward "little Eichmanns" Churchill, the "ethnic studies" professor at the University of Colorado whose odious remark comparing the victims of 9/11 to Nazi bureaucrats sparked a firestorm of eminently deserved criticism? The closer one looked...
Diagnosing Lear
Doctors have been trying to diagnose King Lear for more than two centuries. They haven't succeeded, of course, for a couple of reasons that are not mutually exclusive: first, King Lear does not exist, and second he is not available for tests or examination....
Energy Fields
Futile--the Winds-- To a Heart in port-- Done with the Compass-- Done with the Chart! --Emily Dickinson The winds must come from somewhere when they blow. . . . If I could tell you I would let you know. --W. H....
Frank Stella Three Ways
Frank Stella is an unstoppable force. His work is so consistently unexpected and, more often than not, so full of youthful nerve that it's difficult to believe he has been exhibiting for almost half a century--since 1959, when one of his severe, brooding...
Gallery Chronicle
This is a month of reevaluations in the art world. The auction season has broken records. In May, at Sotheby's, Christie's, and Phillips de Pury, over 120 modern and contemporary artists saw their prices reach new highs. The auction houses realized $837...
Geoffrey Scott: "A Sort of Aesthetic Person"
Geoffrey Scott is a spectral figure in twentieth-century English literary culture. I have known people who have read Robert Skidelsky's biography of John Maynard Keynes, Meryle Secrest's biography of Bernard Berenson, and R. W. B. Lewis's biography of...
Getting It Right?
"For those who remember journalism back in a 1970S heyday they can't explain to to [sic] the young, [David] Halberstam's death was not just the death of a hero, it was like the death of the great Hollywood stars--Katharine Hepburn, Clark Gable." So wrote...
Glory & Grandeur at the Met
With the reopening of the Metropolitan's Greek and Roman galleries, the Great Hall of this museum has become a compelling visual metaphor for the Mediterranean. (1) Entering Richard Morris Hunt's grandiloquent space is now not only a progress into the...
Mr. Smith Goes to Hanover
Congratulations to Stephen Smith! In our April issue, we reported on the candidacy of Mr. Smith, a professor at the University of Virginia Law School, who was running against three other Dartmouth alumni for a spot on the Dartmouth Board of Trustees....
Some Words of Thanks
With this issue, Volume 25, Number 10, The New Criterion completes its twentieth-fifth anniversary season. For the last several years, we've taken this space in our June issue to thank the people and institutions who have made The New Criterion possible....
"Surreal Things"
"Surreal Things" Victoria & Albert Museum, London. March 29, 2007-July 22, 2007 "Surreal Things" is a capitalist success story. Surrealism began as a radical ideology with inputs from Marx and Freud. Its originators, men like Andre Breton and Louis...
Weill Bodies
Maxwell Anderson, Langston Hughes, Alan Jay Lerner, Elmer Rice, Oscar Hammerstein II, Maurice Magre, Ira Gershwin, Bertolt Brecht, Howard Dietz, Ogden Nash, Roger Fernay--what do all these writers have in common? The answer is Kurt Weill. Weill (1900-1950)...
Why the Art World Is a Disaster
It is now that we begin to encounter the fevered quest for novelty at any price, it is now that we see insincere and superficial cynicism and deliberate conscious bluff; we meet, in a word, the calculated exploitation of this art as a means of destroying...