New Criterion

A magazine that publishes articles, notes and comment on cultural life in America. Publishes contributions from poets, authors, public policy scholars, humanities lecturers, and critics. Includes poetry, arts criticism, and commentary. Departments in thea

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 8, April

Arcadia at the Metropolitan
Gazing coolly and a little skeptically from a celebrated self-portrait, the painter himself greets us as we enter "Poussin and Nature: Arcadian Visions" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. (1) The image, in the collection of the Louvre, is a paradigm...
Blurring the Lines
Back in January, you may remember, I was holding my breath to see if Rudy Giuliani's attempt to make an attack on the news media a winning strategy in the Florida primary would work (see "A Kick in the Pants" in The New Criterion of February, 2008)--or,...
David Mamet Grows Up
We had always assumed that the playwright David Mamet was, as he described himself recently, "a brain-dead liberal." But, lo! it is the season of Easter, miracles are abroad, and Mamet, in the pages of The Village Voice no less, revealed himself to have...
Gallery Chronicle
What is it that draws us back to the Whitney Biennial every other year? This thought crossed my mind as I jumped down the staircase of Marcel Breuer's Legoland museum on Madison Avenue, hooked a left in the lobby, and made for the exit. I was going for...
Heaney in Love
It may be too sweeping to say that modern poetry is unhappy poetry, but it is certainly true that modern poems about marriage are almost always about unhappy marriages. The catalogue might begin with the hopelessness of Hardy's "We Sat at the Window":...
Signs of the Times
History may be more than bunk, and more than one damn thing after another, but unfortunately it does not consist of a series of neat, comprehensible lessons; even those who do know history appear doomed to repeat it. Still, the temptation to draw occasionally...
Spitzer: Born-Again Leninist
It would have been interesting to have had Bill Buckley's reaction to the implosion of Eliot Spitzer, prosecutorial bully, patronizer of expensive prostitutes, and former governor of New York. We suspect that he would have agreed with a recent article...
The Kingdom of Never-to-Be
Walter de la Mare (1873-1956) was never a Poet of Importance. He made no prophecies, issued no manifestos. To the burning questions of the age he responded, if at all, only with dreamy silence. He was doggedly vague. If he ever contemplated the Zeitgeist,...
William F. Buckley Jr., 1925-2008
When our friend William F. Buckley Jr. died on February 27 at 82, the world poured forth a library of grateful recollection. His passing made the cover of Newsweek, The Weekly Standard, and the front page of The New York Times. National Review, which...