New Criterion

A magazine that publishes articles, notes and comment on cultural life in America. Publishes contributions from poets, authors, public policy scholars, humanities lecturers, and critics. Includes poetry, arts criticism, and commentary. Departments in thea

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 2, October

Augustus Saint-Gaudens & the American Monument
The great drama of American culture has been its ongoing dialogue with Europe. Lacking a native fine-art tradition, early American artists were keenly aware that one measure of the new country's legitimacy would be to match the creative accomplishments...
Blossom Time at ABT
There is a fundamental difference between American Ballet Theatre and the New York City Ballet. Actually, there are a number of fundamental differences between ABT, launched in 1940, and NYCB, which took root in 1948 after many short-lived flowerings....
Cushing Academy, RIP
Cushing Academy, in Ashburnham, Massachusetts, looks like a traditional New England prep school. It boasts the ivied halls, the well-kempt playing fields, a venerable pedigree dating back to 1865. Like the unhappy scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz, however,...
Gallery Chronicle
Many people have asked me how the art world is doing in the economic downturn. I am sorry to report that the art world died in early August. This tragic event was not unexpected, nor was it unwelcome. The previous several months had been rough. The end...
Harvard's Latest PC Travesty
We admit, however, to experiencing a brief flash of empathy with Headmaster Tracy when a 1,095-page tome entitled A New Literary History of America plopped heavily on our desk. Edited by Greil Marcus ("notable for producing scholarly and literary essays...
Luck of the Irish
Much of Irish history and a great deal of Irish drama appear to have been cleverly constructed to substantiate the least plausible fancies of Sigmund Freud. All those raging sons of Cuchulainn, The Playboy of the Western World, endless contests of fathers...
Never Such Innocence Again
Except for the vague impression of a heavily built, benignly gruff, occasionally encountered man with short silver hair, I cannot claim to remember my great-uncle Tom very well. Tom Royden was, I understand, an English country doctor of the old school...
Our Diminished Debate
As I write, the media world continues to debate what Serena Williams said, since the noise of the crowd at the U.S. Open Tennis Tournament drowned out at least some of her words. By one account, those words included: "I swear to God I'm f-- going to...
"Time Will Tell: Ethics & Choices in Conservation."
"Time Will Tell: Ethics & Choices in Conservation" Yale University Art Gallery. May 22-September 6, 2009 A museum visit can be exhilarating, inspiring, but also, by turns, infuriating or just plain boring. This is particularly true when visiting...
Welcome National Affairs
In April 2005, after a run of forty years, The Public Interest, the distinguished quarterly founded by Daniel Bell and Irving Kristol, ceased publication. It was a sad moment for anyone interested in intelligent analysis and debate about the direction...