New Criterion

A magazine that publishes articles, notes and comment on cultural life in America. Publishes contributions from poets, authors, public policy scholars, humanities lecturers, and critics. Includes poetry, arts criticism, and commentary. Departments in thea

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 7, March

A Stupid Party
The New Criterion has often had occasion to comment of the dominance of left-leaning ideology in American universities. In this space in October 2002, for example, we reported on "The Shame of America's One-Party Campuses" an article published in American...
Bad Faith, Common Currency
They're b-a-a-a-c-k! Those horrible weapons of mass destruction may not be much use at destroying people, but there's still hope for them, in some quarters, as a useful means to the destruction of George W. Bush's presidency. After a brief lay-off...
Darwinizing Politics
Paul H. Rubin Danvinian Politics: The Evolutionary Origin of Freedom. Rutgers University Press, 256 pages, $25 Suddenly, "Darwinian" design and interpretative techniques are not only permissible but also--in some privileged venues--fashionable....
Exhibition Note
"A Beautiful and Gracious Manner: The Art of Parmigianino" at The Frick Collection, New York. January 27, 2004-April 18, 2004 Is some Parmigianino better than no Parmigianino? That is the question. It seems only yesterday that this artist formerly...
Furst among Equals
Since 1988, the American writer Alma Furst has written seven books that for want of a more precise term might be called "historical thrillers." The close of the Cold War, some believe, has put an end to the great spy novel tradition that began with...
Norman Podhoretz & the Nature of Things
"We had an intellectually coherent thing. The American people knew what the rules were and then we did whatever." The year was 1993, and a newly installed William Jefferson Clinton was unburdening himself to The Washington Post about the difficulties...
Prizes for Everyone
Remember the Caucus Race in Alice in Wonderland? The creatures "began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over." "But who has won?" the contestants asked when everyone stopped moving....
Reflections on the Black Cap
A friend of mine has just been made a High Court judge. Among the majestic paraphernalia that he has had to acquire--the scarlet robes, the wigs full-bottomed and otherwise, the pressed white gloves, the satin gaiters, the silver buckles and so forth--is...
Religion in America: Ancient & Modern
All culture arises out of religion. When religious faith decays, culture must decline, though often seeming to flourish for a space after the religion which has nourished it has sunk into disbelief ... no cultured person should remain indifferent to...
Sea Changes
In December 1848, shortly before his seventeenth birthday, Edouard Manet left France on a merchant vessel sailing to Rio de Janeiro and back; the voyage lasted almost four months. Earlier that year, he had failed the entrance examination for naval...
Stromanizing
It takes hours daily of blind instinctive moving and fumbling to find the revealing gesture, and the process goes on for weeks before I am ready to start composing.... This is the kernel, the nucleus of the dance. All the design develops from this....
The Quiet German?
Wolfgang Koeppen A Sad Affair, translated by Michael Hofmann. W. W. Norton, 176 pages, $23.95 For all the pointed social criticism in his fiction, Wolfgang Koeppen's silences have spoken louder than his words. Silence is a freighted subject for...
The Voice Impersonator
Ezra Pound is the supreme ventriloquist of American literature. Over the course of his long and often scandalous career, he turn by turn assumed the voices of a medieval Italian sonneteer of the dolce stil nuovo school, a Confucian sage, a Provencal...