New Criterion

A magazine that publishes articles, notes and comment on cultural life in America. Publishes contributions from poets, authors, public policy scholars, humanities lecturers, and critics. Includes poetry, arts criticism, and commentary. Departments in thea

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 10, June

"Dreams of Nature: Symbolism from Van Gogh to Kandinsky"
"Dreams of Nature: Symbolism from Van Gogh to Kandinsky" Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. February 24-June 17, 2012 "Dreams of Nature" surveys the symbolist movement as expressed in landscape painting across Europe from Mallorca to western Russia, and is...
Europe between the Vaclavs
When the Czech president Vaclav Klaus stood to eulogize the former Czech president Vaclav Havel at a requiem mass last December, mourners in Prague's soaring St. Vitus Cathedral listened with great anticipation. What would one half of the Czech Republic's...
Gallery Chronicle
Has the periphery become the new center? It depends on where you look. In the art world, it was another month, another record price at auction, this time $120 million for a pastel version of The Scream by Edvard Munch. The news of such sales has become...
Hidden Affinities
To step into the discreetly illumined rooms of the major new Byzantine exhibition at the Met is to experience, with a gentle shock, some of the wide-eyed wonder which early visitors to the court at Constantinople felt well over a millennium ago. (1)...
Resurrection of a Salesman
There is a flaw at the center of Death of a Salesman. As we watch Willy Loman pin-wheeling around like a human pinata under Arthur Miller's psychic assault, we must ask ourselves: What is actually going on, here, on this stage? Are we expected to believe...
The Fourth Revolution
The United States has been shaped by three far-reaching political revolutions: Thomas Jefferson's "revolution of 1800," the Civil War, and the New Deal. Each of these upheavals concluded with lasting institutional and cultural adjustments that set the...
The Lessons of Culture
We sit by and watch the Barbarian. We tolerate him. In the long stretches of peace, we are not afraid. We are tickled by his reverence, his comic inversion of our old certitudes and our fixed creeds refreshes us: we laugh. But as we laugh, we are watched...
The Limits of Universalism
I'd like to thank Roger Kimball for that generous introduction. Our friendship by now spans the decades since we met at Bill Buckley's house. Bill infused the lives of all he touched. And he inspired a generation to define a new concept of conservatism...
The Mendacity of Walter Duranty
Ask any journalist to name the most disreputable figure in his profession, and one name immediately comes to mind--the late New York Times reporter, Walter Duranty. Duranty is known for reporting on the Ukrainian famine precipitated by Joseph Stalin...
The "New" Barnes
There cannot be many architects who have refused a job on moral grounds. I can only think of one, and whenever an architect accepts a commission that is in some way odious or objectionable, I find myself thinking of him. In 1832, Julius Eugen Ruhl, the...
Thoughts on 30
With this issue, The New Criterion completes its thirtieth season of publication. It has been a bittersweet year for us. On the positive side, we have enjoyed a remarkable anniversary. We believe that The New Criterion consistently delivers some of the...
"Turner Inspired: In the Light of Claude"
"Turner Inspired: In the Light of Claude" The National Gallery, London. March 14-June 5, 2012 In this exhibition the strong link between Claude Gellee dit le Lorrain and J. M. W. Turner is emphasized by placing particular paintings by each of them from...
Welcome to Fantasyland
The best line about the recent elections in Italy, France, and Greece came from the excellent Daniel Finkelstein of The Times of London, who wrote that "voters went to the polls to see if they agreed that two plus two equals four and decided that they...