New Statesman (1996)

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 4774, January 9

Advertising: Gay Dollar Outs Ford
For a few days it looked like another victory for the American religious right, and certainly the right was celebrating in those terms. Now, however, it is revealed as something like the opposite: vivid proof of the power of the gay dollar. The...
A Load of Balls: Angst-Ridden Veteran Makes a Hash of His London Debut
Match Point (12A) Woody Allen might have made a career out of his neuroses, but his demons should be appeased by the amount of goodwill he is still capable of generating. Forget the scandals, ignore the lacklustre films such as 2004's Melinda and...
A Question of Identity
The card of identity: I seem to have lived with it forever, yet its meaning continues to elude me. I cannot remember how many I have had, and carried about the world, and still carry--the name, the definition, the picture, the antecedents, the accreditation,...
Competition: Win Vouchers to Spend at Any TESCO Store
Competition No 3911 Set by Terry Goodhill, 5 December White House staff have been ordered to take an ethics refresher course. Report by Ms de Meaner Superb! How I laffed. I was very sorry to lose J Seery (Bush: "It is not fair to do a favour...
Diary: This Christmas I Go to One Party, Drink a Few Glasses of Wine, and Catch the Train Home. I Can Tell I'm a More Sober Individual Because I Don't Fall Asleep and Miss My Stop
When I was a binger, I always approached the Christmas period with trepidation. During the rest of the year, I binged on food, and alcohol, and drugs. I hated it, and I hated myself for doing it. The only solace was a brief moment every so often, a...
Drink: From Parties to Sales Shopping, Few Things Aren't Enhanced by a Glass of Fizz
Gosh, eating, drinking and having fun certainly do take it out of one. The school Christmas holidays are only two weeks long, but that's long enough to develop habits of shocking decadence. I've been sleeping in till 8.30 and waking from long, complicated,...
Events: The Ns Guide to What's Going on in Politics, Current Affairs and Culture
DESIGNING MODERN BRITAIN Overview of design in Britain from the 1930s to plans for the 2012 Olympic Games. Runs to 26 November 2006. Design Museum, 28 Butler's Wharf, Shad Thames, London SE12YD. Nearest Tube: London Bridge/Tower Hill/Tower...
Food: Islington's Trendiest Eatery Has Spawned an Unsuccessful Imitator
Without question, the trendiest place to eat on Upper Street in Islington, north London--a street with more than its share of trendy eateries--is Ottolenghi. This restaurant-cum-deli opened its Islington branch about a year and a half ago, and it immediately...
'From the Ashes of Political Idealism, Religion Has Risen, Seductive Because It Offers a Simplistic Division of Right from Wrong That Suits Both Political Spin and Political Vision': "Can Politics Remain Secular?" We Asked for Last Year's Webb Essay Competition. It Must, Argues the Winner, Katy Long, Because If We Continue to Pander to Blind Faith, Our Vision of a Just Society Will Die
The politics of our secular modern age is the "art of the possible". In fact, politics might be better framed as a contest for the ownership of the universal ideal of a just society. Justice, after all, is as much the aim of sharia law as the goal...
Gaza: Kidnappers Point the Way to Anarchy
If you live in Gaza you put up with things others would find disconcerting. There are the thunderous sonic booms from Israeli fighter jets, the distant thuds of shells landing in Gaza's new "no-go zone", the nightly machine-gun banter of the Palestinian...
Hollywood Satire: A Lavish but Pointless Revival of an Early Tinseltown Spoof
Once in a Lifetime Olivier Theatre, London SE1 In 1927, when the population of the United States was half what it is today, the movies already attracted 55 million viewers every week. But Hollywood's golden age was just beginning. Warner Brothers...
It's the Way an Embassy Turns Down Your Visa Request That Tells You Everything You Need to Know about the Country in Question
The Congolese official behind the glass didn't even bother to make eye contact as she pronounced the words. "You will have to go to the ministry of information in Kinshasa to get authorisation." [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] For a moment I stared at...
National Portrait: Gabby Aussie and Tight-Lipped Monarch Make a Perfect Match
The Queen by Rolf (BBC1) The continuity announcer promised "an intimate portrait of an intimate portrait being made". It was an interesting thought, because we know the Queen does not do intimacy, at least not with her subjects. Rolf Harris, on...
Notebook: In Five Years, Disney Princess Has Bloomed into a Hugely Successful Multinational Brand
This Christmas, it was easy to find a present for my three-year-old daughter, Honey. A nylon Snow White dress complete with hooped skirt and cape (available from Woolworths for [pounds sterling]15) was all she wanted. She hasn't seen the Disney classic,...
Over Here, Mona! with Galleries Reporting Record Visitor Figures, Our Appetite for Art Has Never Been Greater. and Yet There Is a Crisis in the Way We Look at It. an Impatient Glance Is No Substitute for the Searching Gaze
On a recent visit to Madrid, I realised how unbearable the crisis in looking has become. It was an off-season, midweek morning in winter, but the Prado was overflowing with a cosmopolitan assortment of visitors. They all seemed eager to pay the entry...
Parking: Coneheads versus Anti-Cones
I thought I had seen the last of shenanigans involving traffic cones when I left university ten years ago. But now I find them being wielded not only in broad daylight but by sober adults. Last year we moved to a street in suburban south-west London...
Phillip Whitehead, 1937-2005
A crusading journalist and maker of current affairs documentaries, an MP with a deep commitment to tackling the most challenging social problems, and a hardworking MEP dedicated to keeping Britain (and the Labour Party) in Europe, Phillip Whitehead,...
Radio: Andy Kershaw, Who Wants to Get You and Yours off the Airwaves, Is Already My Hero of 2006
I have made several radio New Year resolutions. The first is to forswear listening to things that I know will make me angry--chiefly, late-night programmes on BBC 5 Live and, on slow news days or when Carolyn Quinn is having a day off, Radio 4's Today....
Seen, Not Heard: Helen Chappell Discovers That These Days There's More to Mime Than French Clowns in White Make-Up
Imagine a bare blue stage and a man tap-dancing to Max Bygraves's version of the song "You Need Hands". He scoops up a wire-mesh sculpture of an old man and strikes up a conversation with it. In a darkened room in another part of town, beetles scamper...
Technohype Bites Back: Does Your Quad-Band, Polyphonic Camphone Make You Feel Slightly Sick? It Should. Our Addiction to Pointless Technology Will Be the Death of Us All, Argues David Cox
Looking back on the festivities, do you perhaps feel Santa let you down? Maybe your son's [pounds sterling]90 Roboraptor is already lying abandoned, its state-of-the-art animatronics no match for the comforting, one-eyed gaze of his tattered old teddy....
The Death of Freedom: The Rights of Ordinary People to Speak out against an Unjust War and Atrocities Unleashed in Their Name Are Being Crushed. Fascism Is at the Door. Who Else, Asks John Pilger, Will Fight It?
On Christmas Eve, I dropped in on Brian Haw, whose hunched, pacing figure was just visible through the freezing fog. For four and a half years, Brian has camped in Parliament Square with a graphic display of photographs that show the terror and suffering...
The Download
In this doctor's opinion, it's a fallacy that if you're feeling down the best sonic remedy is straight, empathetic miserablism. What you actually need is to be taken from your Leonard Cohen-esque squalor and up to a state of euphoric bliss, ideally...
The Failure to Rebuild Iraq
It was Tony Blair who brought history into it. That was in a speech to the US Congress in July 2003, when he declared that he was "confident history will forgive" those who, a couple of months earlier, had destroyed the "threat" from Saddam Hussein....
The Fan: What Had Happened to Harry Kewell? Had a Bird Decided to Nest on His Head?
Only half a season to go to the World Cup, so time to read the runes, and the Rons, and the Roons--goodness, there are just so many Do Ron Rons in football these days. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Hair. After almost a year now of boring haircuts, Liverpool's...
The Politics Column: Maybe an MP or Two Might Cross the Floor to Cameron. Could Shaun Woodward Do It Twice? (Churchill Did, after All)
We are back, then, in the bracing climate of three-party politics. I don't mean the Liberal Democrats, of course: for that ragtag, plucky bunch the only way is down. The new triangle in British politics is the one formed by Tony Blair and his two heirs...
Tsunami: How Not to Respond to a Crisis
It was natural that the first anniversary of the tsunami should have received lavish coverage: with more than 275,000 killed and four million made homeless in 12 countries, this was an event on an extraordinary scale. It was natural, too, that we...
Urban Life: Racial Violence, Aimed at Destroying Love, Defines Britishness as We Know It
I will remember 2005 as the year in which we were force-fed the virtues of Britishness--fair play, democracy and generosity of spirit. Those of us who form the new communities were expected to shed our past and don the garments of this marvellous civilisation,...
Village Life: The Resigner's Return, Peevish Pete's New Pal and the Pranks of Ming the Merciless
That serial cabinet resigner Alan Milburn is back as the outgoing leader's counsel on public service reform, a process known, in the Tory era, as privatisation. A Labourite of the recalcitrant tendency, summoned to No 10 for a prime ministerial ear-bashing,...