New Zealand Journal of Psychology

Publication covering psychology and mental health.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 2, July

Factor Structure and Response Bias of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R) in a Female Undergraduate Sample from New Zealand
As self-report measures of clinical constructs are increasingly administered to student populations, it is important that the psychometric properties of such measures are investigated. Additionally, the response bias intrinsic in self-report responses...
Psychologists in Physical Health Services in New Zealand
Explored utilisation of psychologists in physical health services in New Zealand. Psychology Advisors and Professional Leaders in District Health Boards (DHBs) were surveyed about the DHB psychologist workforce, particularly in physical health. Seventeen...
Te Ara Hohou Rongo (the Path to Peace): Maori Conceptualisations of Inter-Group Forgiveness
A reasonable body of psychological research focusing on forgiveness in interpersonal contexts has highlighted its benefits to psychological wellbeing (McCullouch, 2001; Enright, 2001; Murray, 2002). However, much of the existing literature has been...
Training Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Practitioners in New Zealand: From University to Clinical Practice
The present study evaluated the transfer of skills taught in a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy training programme to work practice. Seventy-three past trainees from varying mental health professions completed self-report questionnaires exploring key...
Wanna Drive? Driving Anxiety and Fear in a New Zealand Community Sample
Driving anxiety can impact everyday functioning and is common following motor vehicle crashes. However, no research has investigated its general community prevalence, despite the consistent finding that driving anxiety is not always a function of a...
Who Are 'We'? Implicit Associations between Ethnic and National Symbols for Maori and Pakeha in New Zealand
Research examining how New Zealanders perceive their nation and its peoples remains scarce. The current study examined one specific aspect of such cognitions--that of the degree to which self-identified members of the Indigenous population (Maori)...
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