Michigan Historical Review

Scholarly publication devoted to the history of Michigan. Covers political, economic, social, and cultural history.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 1, Spring

Anti-Injunction Campaigns and the Transformation of Labor Law in Detroit, 1915 to 1921
The year 1916 appeared promising for advocates of labor-injunction reform at the national level. The Clayton Antitrust Act had been passed two years earlier and offered hope to workers that labor injunctions stemming from the Sherman Antitrust Act...
Books Received
It has been some time--too long, in fact--since we have listed books which the MHR has received but been unable to review. (A partial list last appeared in the Fall 2006 issue.) Many of these deserve attention. Some, such as new editions of previously...
Editor's Page
First an announcement: Starting with 2011, electronic access to the Michigan Historical Review will come through a new Current Scholarship Program (CSP) being launched by JSTOR. Print publication will go on as always, and readers of paper copies will...
Michigan Newspapers: A Two-Hundred-Year Review
Introduction It has been said that journalism is the first draft of history, and thus newspapers are indispensable historical sources. The Michigan Essay; or, the Impartial Observer appeared on the streets of Detroit on August 31, 1809, and although...
No Better Way? the Kalamazoo Mall and the Legacy of Pedestrian Malls
On August 19, 1959, the battle to save America's crumbling downtowns opened a new and important front. In Kalamazoo, Michigan, about fifty thousand reporters, citizens, and dignitaries witnessed the unveiling of the first pedestrian shopping mall in...
The Price of Pacifism: Rebecca Shelley and Her Struggle for Citizenship
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Rebecca Shelley's life (1887 to 1984) was defined by two world wars and her personal commitment to absolute pacifism. This commitment, which greatly complicated Shelley's life, led her to test existing legal rulings about...