Michigan Historical Review

Scholarly publication devoted to the history of Michigan. Covers political, economic, social, and cultural history.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 1, Spring

Editor's Page
Jeremy Mumford's prizewinning essay, which opens this issue, explores themes of cultural identity and interchange between Native Americans and European Americans through the poignant story of one couple's promising yet troubled marriage. These are...
From Reading Shakespeare to Reforming Burlesque: The Minneapolis Woman's Club and the Women's Welfare League, 1907-1920
In 1915 William Koenig, manager of Minneapolis's Gayety theater, received a letter describing a burlesque show soon to appear on his stage. "It is a very beautiful act and one that I am sure will cause considerable comment," wrote I. H. Herk, the main...
Jobs and Justice: Detroit, Fair Employment, and Federal Activism during the Second World War
In the history of the American home front during the Second World War, Detroit holds a special place, as the Motor City was at the heart of major wartime transformations. The conversion to war production resuscitated the city's industries, and Detroit...
Mixed-Race Identity in a Nineteenth-Century Family: The Schoolcrafts of Sault Ste. Marie, 1824-27. (1998 Student Essay Prize Winner)
In the autumn of 1824 the Schoolcraft family set out from Sault Ste. Marie, at the mouth of Lake Superior in northern Michigan Territory, to visit New York City. For Jane, who had seldom left the remote village where she was born, this was her first...
More Than a Union: The Teaching Assistants Association and Its 1970 Strike against the University of Wisconsin
Meeting at Port Huron, Michigan in 1962, the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) issued a manifesto outlining the worldview of a new generation of young radicals. The Port Huron Statement, which articulated the basic principles of the New Left...
The Great Lakes in Philadelphia: Archival Report
American Philosophical Society 105 South Fifth Street Philadelphia, PA 19106-3386 The American Philosophical Society (APS) traces its roots to 1743, when the Quaker botanist John Bartram suggested that the American colonies might benefit from an...
The New Deal. (Bibliography)
The New Deal, following the onset of the disastrous Great Depression, represented perhaps the most significant expansion of the federal government's role and responsibility in the twentieth century. It established a number of assumptions that still...
Women and Lay Activism: Aspects of Acculturation in the German Lutheran Churches of Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1870 - 1917
On January 18,1914 the German Erste Evangelisch-Lutherische Zion Kirche (First Evangelical-Lutheran Zion Church) of Ann Arbor held a celebration. The women's society of the church marked twenty-five years of existence with a church service, musical...