Michigan Historical Review

Scholarly publication devoted to the history of Michigan. Covers political, economic, social, and cultural history.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 2, Fall

Building a Better Prison: The First Three Decades of the Detroit House of Correction
After a visit in the mid- 1860s a pair of experts gave their studied appraisal that "the Detroit house of correction holds preeminence among the prisons of its class." (1) From time to time many others expressed similar views about this unique prison,...
Editor's Page
Although history may not repeat itself, this issue's articles remind us that many social and political problems are hardy perennials. In an era when prisons consume an increasing share of state budgets, it may be some consolation to realize that nineteenth-century...
Following the North Star: Canada as a Haven for Nineteenth-Century American Blacks
Colonel Samuel Ragland, an Alabama planter, received an unusual visitor one day in the early 1850s. The caller was James Rapier, a relatively prosperous free black man, and the visit concerned Milton, one of Ragland's slaves. During a recent business...
On the Defensive: Walter Reuther's Testimony before the McClellan Labor Rackets Committee
From January 1957 to March 1960, the United States Senate's Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field, popularly known as the McClellan Committee, pursued the most extensive investigation of labor-management relations...
"Our Children Are in Danger of Becoming Little Indians": Protestant Missionary Children and Dakotas, 1835-1862
In 1841 Mary Riggs, an evangelical Protestant missionary to the Dakotas of Minnesota, wrote to her parents that "our children are in danger of becoming little Indians in their tastes, feelings, and habits." (1) Constant contact with Dakota adults and...
United States Civil War. (Bibliography)
The American Civil War stands as the great dividing point in United States history. Few events rival its historical significance or ongoing interest among both scholars and the general public. For our readers who would like a greater understanding...
Waiting for Water: Service Discrimination and Polish Neighborhoods in Milwaukee, 1870-1910
Water supply is a necessary component of modern urban life. Nineteenth-century American cities discovered this need and took steps to meet it in a variety of fashions. Several east-coast cities had some sort of supply available by 1830; by the Civil...