Michigan Historical Review

Scholarly publication devoted to the history of Michigan. Covers political, economic, social, and cultural history.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 1, Spring

After the Conquest: Michilimackinac, a Borderland in Transition, 1760-1763
On the morning of June 2, 1763, opposing teams of Ojibwe and Sac warriors played a game of baggatiway or lacrosse outside the land gate of Fort Michilimackinac. The Ojibwe used the contest as a ruse to surprise British officers and soldiers who had...
Apples on the Border: Orchards and the Contest for the Great Lakes
In the fall of 1791 Elkanah Watson toured western New York, searching for real-estate opportunities. Ten years earlier there had been few white settlements in this region; it was the heart of Iroquois country. But the American Revolution had shattered...
Introduction: Emerging Borderlands
Surrounded by four of the Great Lakes, Michigan occupies a distinct space in a transnational region marked by centuries of cultural, economic, environmental, political, and social interaction. To explore this facet of the state's history, the spring...
Merchant Representatives and the French River World, 1763-1803
The French empire in North America came to an abrupt end with the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763. (1) With the "scratch of a pen," as Colin G. Calloway has explained it, the map of North America was drastically altered. (2) New France and the...
The Gnadenhutten Effect: Moravian Converts and the Search for Safety in the Canadian Borderlands
In a journal entry composed on April 8, 1782, Moravian missionary David Zeisberger penned a critical observation: "The world is already too narrow." It had been a month since an American militia unit under the command of Lt. Col. David Williamson had...
The Road to Ruin? "Civilization" and the Origins of a "Michigan Road Band" of Potawatomi
A road can be a very boring thing, until someone wants to build one across your land. Today road building often evokes heated debates over property, commerce, traffic, tradition, and even race and culture. In this regard, little has changed since 1826....
The Transformation of the Detroit Land Market and the Formation of the Anglo-American Border, 1783-1796
In November 1783, British diplomats in Paris agreed to cede the vast territory of the trans-Appalachian west to the newly independent United States of America as part of the treaty that ended the Revolutionary War. For many residents of the Great Lakes,...
Writing Michigan History from a Transborder Perspective
Histories of individual American states constitute a peculiar kind of political history. Pivoting on the fact of statehood, these works invariably combine a geopolitical narrative of how a state came into existence with a heavily social and economic...