Newspaper Research Journal

newspaperpaper Research Journal is a magazine specializing in Media topics.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 4, Fall

Access, Use and Preferences for Online Newspapers
During the past few years, the rapid growth of the Internet has changed the media landscape. Having realized the potential of the Web, more than 2,900 newspapers currently operate online, of which more than 1,800 are U.S.-based.(1) While online newspapers...
From Map to Machine: Conceptualizing and Designing News on the Internet
An already crowded news media market is making room for the Internet. Roughly 57 million Americans now use the Internet, and usage among adults increased 260 percent from 1992 to 1998.(1) Today, between 15 percent and 25 percent of Americans receive...
Generation X: Is Its Meaning Understood?
Since the label Generation X was first used in Douglas Coupland's 1991 novel(1) to depict the angst of the MTV generation, the label has been used by newspaper and magazine journalists, network and local TV news anchors, print and broadcast advertisers,...
How Public Journalism Set the Agenda for a Public Safety Complex
In 1997, The Pew Foundation for Public Journalism honored coverage of a proposed public safety complex by a medium-sized Knight-Ridder newspaper in Florida. The proposed multi-million dollar public safety complex including a city hall, fire and police...
Innovators or News Hounds?
A study of early adopters of the electronic newspaper The evolution of the newspaper is a continuing source of discussion and argument among publishers, journalists, researcher and other media professionals. The dramatic advances made possible by...
Newspaper Ombudsmanship as Viewed by Ombudsmen and Their Editors
As a mechanism to promote journalistic accountability and credibility, the ombudsman has enjoyed persistent albeit limited success. The idea - originated in Sweden nearly two centuries ago to spur responsibility and responsiveness(1) - came to United...
Portrait vs. Landscape: Potential Users' Preferences for Screen Orientation
Nearly all documents routinely used in day-to-day lives -- newspapers, magazines, books, reports, brochures, letters -- are portrait-oriented -- that is, they are taller than they are wide. On the other hand, television and movie screens, designed...

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