Occupational Hazards

Reports news and information on industrial safety, occupational health, environmental control, insurance, first aid, medical care, and hazardous material control. Coverage includes legislative, regulatory, and scientific developments; how-to articles; and

Articles from Vol. 68, No. 9, September

9/11: Safety and Health Lessons Learned: Those Who Took Part in the Rescue, Recovery and Cleanup Operations at the World Trade Center Are Learning That Heroism Alone Is Not Enough to Stay Safe
Five years ago, the nation recoiled in horror as two planes crashed into the World Trade Center towers in New York City on Sept. 11, claiming the lives of more than 3,000 people. After the towers collapsed, firefighters, policemen and other emergency...
Ah ... the Joys of Virtual Reality! as Occupational Hazards Prepares to Launch Its First Safety WebExpo and Conference, I'm Becoming More and More Excited about the Possibilities
On Oct. 4, everyone who has registered for the OCCUPATIONAL HAZARDS Safety WebExpo will have the opportunity to participate in history. This is the first WebExpo launched by OCCUPATIONAL HAZARDS, but I sincerely doubt it will be the last. When our...
Cal/OSHA Feeling the Heat as Death Toll Rises
A hot summer and another spate of heat-related workplace deaths have prompted the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) to ratchet up its efforts to make sure employers are aware of their obligations to protect their outdoor...
Emergency Response: Worst-Case Scenario
Employers have not been blind to the lessons learned from current events, ranging from Hurricane Katrina to 9/11--namely, that any workplace can be negatively affected by events outside of the employer's control. Whether these events are natural,...
Hearing Conservation: It's Not Just for the Workplace Anymore: Best Practices for Developing a Culture of Hearing Conservation, Both at Work and at Home
In the 20-plus years since OSHA implemented detailed noise exposure regulations (29 CFR 1910.95), diligent employers and safety professionals have monitored noise levels, posted warning signs, purchased earplugs and routinely tested employees' hearing....
MSHA Looking for a Few Good Mine Inspectors
With the White House apparently agreeing to accelerate the hiring of mine safety inspectors, MSHA has been searching throughout the United States for qualified applicants. "MSHA is seeking motivated professionals dedicated to helping us to rid the...
Noise Control: It's More Than Just Earplugs: OSHA Requires Employers to Evaluate Engineering and Administrative Controls before Using Personal Protective Equipment
An OSHA inspection at an Atlanta steel mill resulted in a citation for failure to reduce sound levels that could damage employees' hearing. The noise exposures for an 8-hour day were between 91 and 94 decibels (dB). An expert witness testified that...
OSHA Adds APFs to Respiratory Protection Standard
Three years after the agency unveiled the proposed rule in the Federal Register--and after some heated public discussions--OSHA is incorporating assigned protection factors (APFs) for respiratory programs into its respiratory protection standard. ...
OSHA Unveils VPP for Mobile Work Force in Construction
OSHA has launched a nationwide Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) initiative aimed at meeting the unique needs and characteristics of the construction industry. OSHA Administrator Ed Foulke unveiled the new initiative--which OSHA is calling the...
OSHA Urged to Issue Worker Safety Standard for Popcorn Flavoring
Two major labor unions, several dozen scientists and safety and health experts and lawmakers want the Department of Labor and OSHA to issue an emergency temporary standard to protect workers who are exposed to diacetyl, a common ingredient in microwave...
Safer Shiftwork through More Effective Scheduling: A New Program from the Liberty Mutual Research Institute Assesses Worker Injury Rates Based on Work Scheduling Factors
So many industries utilize shiftwork schedules that nearly 15 million full-time workers in the United States work shifts outside the traditional 9-to-5 or flex-time workday, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Yet those added shifts, implemented...
Stressing Safety: Are You Doing More but Enjoying It Less?
A significant majority of leaders in my seminars agree there is more stress now than in the past--and that this adversely affects safety performance. No question, the pace of change seems faster, information can be overwhelming and the demands of living...
Study Examines AED Advisories
Roughly one in five automated external defibrillators (AEDs) was affected by a recall or safety alert between 1996 and 2005, according to a study published in the Aug. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study's authors...
The Silent Killer: Nitrogen Is an Invisible, Tasteless and Odorless Gas That Comprises about 78 Percent of the Air We Breathe. but Its Potential to Kill Workers in or near Confined Spaces Should Never Be Underestimated
On Nov. 5, 2005, two contractors working at Valero Energy Corp.'s Delaware City, Del., oil refinery died from nitrogen asphyxiation. Interviews conducted by the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) indicate the two men were assigned...

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