Journal of Religion and Popular Culture

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 2, Summer

Aliens Are Us: Cosmic Liminality, Remixticism, and Alienation in Psytrance
Introduction We journey from ignorance to knowledge. Growth reflects the advancement of the species. The exploration of the cosmos is a voyage of self-discovery. (1) In popular culture, outer space is suffused with cosmic liminality. It...
Can the Veil Be Cool?
Introduction Literature on the veiling of women in Muslim contexts is abundant. It reaches from Leila Ahmed's critique of ethnocentric views of the veil (1982) to Fatima Mernissi's attempts to trace the veil back to the "almost phobic attitude towards...
Dialogicality and Spiritual Quest in Christian Metal Lyrics
Originally a North American phenomenon, Christian metal (CM) music entered Finland and became a distinct genre there in the 1990s. As secular metal music was already finding itself a strong foothold there, Finland was perhaps an easy target for CM....
Dr. Bronner's "Magic Soaps" Religion: A Tikkun Olam Response to the Holocaust, the Atom Bomb, and the Cold War
Even if some of Moses's ... rules were hygienically beneficial it is a pity to treat him as an enlightened public health administrator, rather than as a spiritual leader. (Douglas 1966, 29) A plastic quart bottle of 18-in-1 Hemp Peppermint Pure-Castile...
Martians, Demons, Vampires, and Vicars: The Church of England in Post-War Science Fiction
Introduction A number of British science fiction texts juxtapose the Church of England against science fiction settings and plots. I will examine the depiction of the Church and its clergy in three works, all landmarks of British science fiction....
Neil Gaiman's Lucifer; Reconsidering Milton's Satan
Neil Gaiman is a prolific and adaptable writer, producing novels for both adults and children, writing screenplays for film and television, and continuing to work in comics (Gaiman). Religious topics are a recurring motif in many of his books; American...
Religious Imperatives, Boogaloo Rhythms: Taking Another Listen to Albert Ayler's New Grass
Introduction Albert Ayler (1) (1936-1970) was a jazz saxophonist who, along with Cecil Taylor, Ornette Coleman, and a handful of others, helped to start the free jazz movement in the early 1960s. His music was the most nakedly emotional of the first...
Shout-Outs to the Creator: The Use of Biblical Themes in Rap Lyrics
Christopher Lasch once diagnosed modern America as a "culture of narcissism," with one of its primary ailments being spiritual malaise, a "resigned worldview," and we are still suffering (Lasch 1979). Surely any religious expression would have its...
Thou Shalt Get Thy Praise On!: Analysis on the Conversion and Community Maintenance Powers of Contemporary Christian Music
This article focuses on Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) and the ways in which the presence of the normalizing gaze within the genre is used to keep Christian youth actively involved in the Christian community. Using Foucault's analysis of the normalizing...
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