Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 4, December

Congressional Support of the President: A Comparison of Foreign, Defense, and Domestic Policy Decision Making during and after the Cold War
With the end of the cold war, it seems unlikely that a broad domestic consensus will arise concerning the role of the United States in the newly emerging international order. Charles Kegley (1993), for instance, believed that the end of the cold war...
Losing Control: The Intraparty Consequences of Divided Government
The divided government literature has focused primarily on two hypotheses: that divided government changes the productivity of government and that it creates increased hostility between the parties. (1) Mayhew's work (1991), which compares the quantity...
Lyndon Johnson, Community Action, and Management of the Administrative State. (Articles)
"The people I want to help," President Johnson told White House aide Joseph Califano, "are the ones who've never held real jobs and aren't equipped to handle them. They have no motivation to reach for something better because the sum total of their...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Pressures of White House Work Life: "Naked in a Glass House". (Features)
"When they come to the White House there's no forty-hour week and they shouldn't expect it," said President Gerald Ford. (1) "It has to be almost a twenty-four-hour-a-day job for both the President and the staff." The White House is a place where the...
The Law: The "Protective Return" Pocket Veto: Presidential Aggrandizement of Constitutional Power
In recent decades, students of the presidency have debated with no little fervor the extent to which the institution has become more imperial, especially and most importantly in the realm of constitutional authority. Many have argued that presidents...
The Little State Department: McGeorge Bundy and the National Security Council Staff, 1961-65
In 1961, President John F. Kennedy and his special assistant for national security affairs, McGeorge Bundy, began a fundamental transformation of the National Security Council (NSC) system and the role of the special assistant. A decade later, amid...
The Office of Communications
The Office of Communications is one of several institutions crucial to the start-up of the White House because of the central place of effective communications in a successful presidency. (1) The four presidents elected to a second term in the post--World...
The Polls: Change and Stability in Public Assessments of Personal Traits, Bill Clinton, 1993-99
Bill Clinton's tenure as president was, on one hand, propitious and lucky, with the nation generally at peace and prosperous. But his tenure was also marked by scandal. Few presidents have been put under such close public scrutiny for their personal...
The Two Presidencies, 1984-98: A Replication and Extension. (Research Note)
Since World War II, Presidents have had much greater success in controlling the nation's defense and foreign policies than in dominating its domestic policies. --Aaron Wildavsky (1966) Wildavsky (1966) contended that in the United States there...
The White House Counsel's Office. (Articles)
The White House counsel's office is at the hub of virtually all presidential activity. Its mandate is to be watchful for and attentive to legal issues that may arise in policy and political contexts involving the president. To fulfill this responsibility,...
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