Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 4, Fall

About This Issue
The Clinton Presidency in Crisis In the spring of 1998, it became clear that the Clinton presidency was deeply enmeshed in scandal. There was a crisis in the sense that important issues were at stake and that the future of his presidency was in...
Bill Clinton and His Crisis of Governance
The dramatic Republican congressional victory in the 1994 elections created a crisis of governing for Bill Clinton. His party was soundly defeated at the polls, and the Republicans obtained majorities in both houses of Congress for the first time since...
Bill Clinton and the Politics of Second Terms
A president's second term almost invariably turns out to be less successful than the first term. Historians may argue about whether the second terms of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison,...
Coping with the Politics of Scandal
The crisis of the Clinton presidency is in many ways a reflection of a much broader and critically important phenomenon in contemporary American politics: the remarkable prominence of the politics of scandal. American politicians, journalists, and...
Epilogue
As the twentieth century closed, historians recorded that the president of the United States had dallied with a lover in the White House itself. A longtime philanderer, the president had assignations outside as well as inside the executive mansion....
Evaluating Presidential Character
During the 1992 presidential campaign, the "character" issue for Bill Clinton hinged on charges, aptly summarized by Bush's political director, Mary Matalin, that he was a "pot-smoking, draft-dodging, womanizer."(1) Near the end of the campaign, Bush...
Executive-Legislative Conflict and the Nomination-Confirmation Controversy in the Lower Federal Judiciary
In systems of governance such as the one in the United States, where there is a separation of powers and where separate elections determine who will control the distinct institutions, executive-legislative relations are cumbersome and perhaps conflictual...
Executive Privilege in the Lewinsky Scandal: Giving a Good Doctrine a Bad Name
Executive privilege is the right of the president and high executive branch officers to withhold information from Congress, the courts, and ultimately the public. It is now a well-established constitutional power--one with a long-standing history in...
Military Action against Iraq
During his first six years in office, President Bill Clinton embraced a broad definition of the power of commander in chief, claiming that it enables him to send troops anywhere in the world, at any time, for any reason, without first seeking authority...
No Place for Amateurs: Some Thoughts on the Clinton Administration and the Presidential Staff
When apportioning blame for the missed opportunities of the Clinton presidency, history may well accord the greatest weight not to the Paula Jones/Monica Lewinsky/Katherine Willey sex scandals but to the series of political misjudgments Clinton and...
President Clinton and Character Questions
President Clinton's critics relentlessly attack him on the character issue. His supporters no longer even bother to put up much of a defense of the president, shrugging their shoulders and saying, "Well, at least he is doing a good job." It is now...
Public Purposes and Private Pursuits: Questions about Bill Clinton
Some years ago, I appeared as a guest on the McNeil-Lehrer News Hour to discuss the moral expectations Americans have of their politicians. One of the other guests had written a book about the hypocrisy of political men who pretended to be good husbands...
Sexual Probity and Presidential Character
In 1998, members of the Clinton administration found themselves playing roles in a drama that the president had created, but they were not sure whether they were involved in a farce or a tragedy. In truth, the sexual imbroglio the president had created...
The Clinton Crisis and the Double Standard for Presidents
This article makes four points: 1. By demanding that politicians, and particularly presidents, be more traditionally moral in private behavior than either private sector leaders or average citizens, the American media has applied a double standard...
The Clinton Reelection Machine: Placing the Party Organization in Peril
By most accounts, the 1996 presidential election was a yawner. On this conventional view, President Clinton had the early edge because his opponent, the former Senate majority leader Bob Dole, was an uninspiring candidate. Dole's nomination, coming...
The Constitutional and Popular Law of Presidential Impeachment
The Constitution is incomplete, ambiguous, or silent on key issues involving impeachment of a president. Democrats and Republicans are inconsistent in their constitutional analysis, each party borrowing from the other's past legal arguments, depending...
The Enabler
When the Free Press published my book, All the President's Kin, in 1981, I very much doubt that the majority of my colleagues in political science were sympathetic to its basic argument. It was a time when, rare exceptions notwithstanding, the president's...
The Item Veto Dispute and the Secular Crisis of the Presidency
America's brief experiment with a presidential item veto came to an abrupt, if expected, end when the Supreme Court ruled on June 25, 1998, that Congress had improperly ceded to the president the de facto power to rewrite legislation when it approved...
The Judicial Confirmation Crisis and the Clinton Presidency
At a Senate Judiciary Committee business meeting on April 2, 1998, the chair of the committee, Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT), announced that he had been asked and had decided "to hold over the judges until the next meeting." This provoked an immediate...
The Once to Future Worlds of Presidents Communicating
The question I ask myself is how did we ever get from there to here? From those halcyon days of 1958 when I joined the White House staff as a twenty-five-year-old speech writer for President Dwight Eisenhower to forty years later awaiting the next...
The Public Presidency Hits the Wall: Clinton's Presidential Initiative on Race
President Clinton, June 14, 1997 When President Bill Clinton made a public appeal for all Americans to begin "a candid conversation on the state of race relations today," he promised both to lead the dialogue and to encourage public officials and...
The "Public" versus the "Private" President: Striking a Balance between Presidential Responsibilities and Immunities
Recent and ongoing political events have raised, once again, the issue of whether the president is or should be "above the law." This has been an enduring concern of the American polity, most recently debated in the context of President Nixon's actions...
The Sound of One Hand Clapping: The World Moves Away from the White House
The concept of leadership implies that there are also followers. A unique feature of the modern presidency is its leadership of the free world or even of the world in its entirety. However, the behavior of followers is usually neglected. The focal...
When Is Presidential Behavior Public and When Is It Private?
On February 27, 1998, the Philadelphia Inquirer quoted a hospital administrator who runs a Republican professional women's group in Louisiana as saying, Well, let me tell you about my dearest friend. Her son has a rare heart disease, and at...
With Enemies like This, Who Needs Friends?
Hillary was right. There is a Clinton conspiracy. Although she did not name names, she indicated that we all knew who they were. And we do. In the first year, it was Robert Dole, who so skillfully engineered the filibuster of Clinton's number one...
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