Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 2, June

"An Informal and Limited Alliance": The President and the Supreme Court
The framers of the Constitution did not make policy making easy. By separating governmental power into multiple institutions and providing for checks and balances between the three branches, the framers created a fragmented, decentralized political...
Executive Privilege and the U.S. Attorneys Firings
President George W. Bush's penchant for secrecy is widely acknowledged by his detractors and even many of his supporters. Although the president says that the war on terror and other contemporary threats to U.S. interests necessitate his expanded use...
Presidential Decision Making and Minority Nominations to the U.S. Courts of Appeals
Institutions whose members fail to reflect the diversity of the population are often taken to be unrepresentative of citizens' policy preferences and potentially undemocratic (Mansbridge 1999; Pitkin 1978). For the courts to be viewed as legitimate,...
Presidential Policy Initiatives: How the Public Learns about State of the Union Proposals from the Mass Media
State of the Union (SOTU) addresses are highly visible moments in a presidency. They offer unparalleled opportunities for presidents to communicate their priorities and accomplishments. Aside from the pageantry, however, what do citizens learn from...
Saving the Presidency from Lawyers
The second Bush presidency has made at least one major contribution to the study of the presidency: It has put the lie to the notion that constitutional powers and institutional relations are less than central to the contemporary presidency and to...
Substance versus Style: Distinguishing Presidential Job Performance from Favorability
No question about politics has been asked with as much frequency and on a topic of such general interest as the Gallup presidential approval question. And few items of public opinion research have garnered as much ink, both inside and outside academia....
The Evolution of the Modern Rhetorical Presidency: A Critical Response
In his study of presidential rhetoric, Teten (2003) asserts that contemporary State of the Union addresses evolved in the early twentieth century. They are shorter and use more inclusive language than the annual presidential addresses of the nineteenth...
The Evolution of the Rhetorical Presidency and Getting Past the Traditional/modern Divide
Almost six years ago, as a graduate student at Vanderbilt University, I was first introduced to a division that exists in the classification of presidential rhetoric and, indeed, of presidents themselves. The "modern" rhetorical presidency, a term...
The Ground War 2000-2004: Strategic Targeting in Grassroots Campaigns
Following the epitaphs written for American political parties in the wake of political and legal changes during the post-World War II era, a resurgence of sorts has occurred that would make George Washington Plunkitt proud. The political parties have...
The Last Word: Presidential Power and the Role of Signing Statements
The presidential bill signing statement is one of many devices that contemporary presidents have developed for use against a recalcitrant Congress, joining with the executive order, memoranda, proclamations, pocket vetoes, and primary unilateral policy...

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