Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 3, September

Interest Groups and Presidential Approval
Job approval ratings are important to presidents and scholars of the presidency for a number of reasons. First, presidents view approval as a source of bargaining leverage with Congress (Edwards 2009): Recent scholarship supports this contention (Cohen...
Nixon's New Deal: Welfare Reform for the Silent Majority
On August 8, 1969, President Nixon went on national television to promote his domestic policy plans. The centerpiece of his policy package and the focus of his national address was his proposal to replace the main federal welfare program, Aid to Families...
Politics or Policy? How Rhetoric Matters to Presidential Leadership of Congress
Three days after his historic inauguration, Barack Obama communicated the following message to then-House Minority Whip Eric Cantor and other Republican congressional leaders on Capitol Hill: "I won" (Calmes and Herszenhorn 2009). (1) Thirteen months...
Polls and Elections: Still Part of the Conversation: Iowa and New Hampshire's Say within the Invisible Primary
The presidential nomination process continues to change, and so too does our understanding of which factors drive nomination outcomes. The most recent changes have come in the form of drastic adjustments to the schedule of state contests. Nomination...
Prior Experience Predicts Presidential Performance
American voters hope to elect presidents who will achieve foreign and domestic success. As a result, presidential candidates frequently discuss their prior experiences eager to convince voters that, if elected, they will perform successfully. While...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Personnel Process in the Modern Presidency
During a presidential election year, public attention naturally turns toward candidates and campaigns. Newscasters and media experts dissect polls and campaign strategy. The best prepared candidates, however, are thinking beyond voting day toward postelection...
The Historical Presidency: Growing Executive Power: The Strange Case of the "Protective Return" Pocket Veto
In his first three-plus years in office, President Barack Obama exercised the presidential veto power only twice. Both vetoes involved relatively minor legislative matters and received little public attention. That Obama would veto only two bills during...
The Law: Can the President Recess Appoint a Vice President?
While the constitutional aspects of the president's recess appointment power have been scrutinized closely over the years (Herz 2005; Note 1957; Rappaport 2005), the question of a president unilaterally and temporarily installing a vice president through...
Yes, Ronald Reagan's Rhetoric Was Unique-But Statistically, How Unique?
While religious affiliation has long been considered to be "one of the most accurate, and least appreciated" indicators of political affiliation (Gallup and Castelli 1989, 249), political scientists paid scant attention to religion in U.S. politics...

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