Professional School Counseling

Professional School Counseling is a journal covering guidance program evaluation, development of new applications for theoretical ideas and current research in school counseling. Founded in 1967, the American School Counselor Association publishes this journal periodically throughout each school year. Article subjects for Professional School Counseling include education, psychology and psychiatry.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 1, October

A Broader and Bolder Approach to School Reform: Expanded Partnership Roles for School Counselors
This article describes a broader, bolder approach to education reform aimed at addressing the social and economic disadvantages that hinder student achievement. Central principles of this approach to reform include the provision of supports such as...
A Multidimensional Study of School-Family-Community Partnership Involvement: School, School Counselor, and Training Factors
A multidimensional study examines both the dimensions of school counselors' involvement in school-family-community partnerships and the factors related to their involvement in partnerships. The School Counselor Involvement in Partnerships Survey was...
Culturally Competent Collaboration: School Counselor Collaboration with African American Families and Communities
Emerging literature on school-family-community partnerships suggests positive educational and social outcomes for students (Koonce & Harper, 2005; Mitchell & Bryan, 2007). This article discusses the historical and contemporary factors and barriers...
Editorial Introduction: Collaboration and Partnerships with Families and Communities
The ASCA National Model[R] (American School Counselor Association, 2005) emphasizes collaboration with school stakeholders as a central role for school counselors. School counselors are often the first or second point of contact for stakeholders (e.g.,...
Empowered Youth Programs: Partnerships for Enhancing Postsecondary Outcomes of African American Adolescents
With the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, the educational community has the opportunity to ensure that underserved populations, such as students of color and poor students, receive the necessary educational support to achieve...
Involving Low-Income Parents and Parents of Color in College Readiness Activities: An Exploratory Study
This article describes an exploratory and descriptive study that examined the parental involvement beliefs, attitudes, and activities of 22 high schoaol counselors who work in high-poverty and high-minority schools. More specifically, this study examined...
Learning from Each Other: A Portrait of Family-School-Community Partnerships in the United States and Mexico
Family-school-community partnerships are critically important for the academic success of all students. Unfortunately, in the face of specific barriers, Mexican immigrants struggle to engage in partnership efforts. In the hopes of promoting the engagement...
Parent Perceptions of Barriers to Academic Success in a Rural Middle School
In focus groups, parents of both academically successful seventh-grade students and at-risk students (i.e., failing one or more classes, numerous behavioral referrals, and/or suspensions) in a rural middle school identified perceived barriers to student...
Promoting Academic Engagement among Immigrant Adolescents through School-Family-Community Collaboration
Schools are receiving students of immigrant origin in unprecedented numbers. Using all ecological framework, the authors reviewed the community, school, familial, and individual challenges that immigrant adolescent students encounter. They examined...
School Counselors' Roles in Developing Partnerships with Families and Communities for Student Success
This article discusses a theoretical perspective, research results, and practical examples that support new roles for school counselors in strengthening school programs of family and community involvement. A modest proposal is offered for school counselors...
Why Do Parents Become Involved in Their Children's Education? Implications for School Counselors
This article discusses a theoretical model of the parental involvement process that addresses (a) why parents become involved in their children's education, (b) the forms their involvement takes, and (c) how their involvement influences both proximal...
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