Queen's Quarterly

An academic journal offering a collection of analysis and reflection in the fields of international relations, science policy, literary criticism, travel writing, economics, religion, short fiction and poetry. Issues feature editorial, several feature art

Articles from Vol. 120, No. 2, Summer

Amour: No Gentle End
Michael Haneke's Amour is indeed a great film, but it is not for the faint-hearted. We often prefer our old people to be feisty and defiant in the face of mortality. In this brilliantly acted story, however, we see the horror of a loving couple who slip...
Berlin: A City Transformed by Art and Remembrance
Berlin's tragic history has been kept alive through countless artistic remembrances, and while these serve to remind us of the ghastly events of the twentieth century, they also add poignancy to the present-day city's vibrant beauty: the clouds of spring...
Gatsby Forever
For all the dazzling sights and sounds of Baz Luhrmann's production, it is Leonardo DiCaprio's interpretation of the mysterious Mr Gatsby that makes the film beautiful. Without him, it's just a mirage. The first time we see Gatsby's face, the sky explodes...
Image World
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A picture, according to the old cliche, is worth a thousand words. That is because the message it communicates is unmistakable and instantaneous. We relate to images in more direct ways than we do to words. Words require more work,...
In the Light Friendship: Simone Weil, Czeslaw Milosz, and Albert Camus
Czeslaw Milosz and Albert Camus were two friends who shared a personal knowledge of how great ideals can turn to tyranny, intolerance, and slaughter. While both reflected on the terrible carnage of the mid-twentieth century, they found themselves drawing...
Marc-Andre Hamelin: On the Road Less Travelled
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] At the age of nine, a boy named Marc-Andre Hamelin arrived at Montreal's Ecole Vincent-d'Indy, to study piano with Yvonne Hubert-the esteemed pedagogue who also taught Louis Lortie, Andre Laplante, and several other prominent pianists...
Miracles and Morals: Artists and the Book of Tobit
Among the numerous paintings showing stories from the Bible in European art, there are many that show scenes from the Book of Tobit. Not well known today, this ancient Hebrew text was still read and treasured in the 1500s and 1600s for its moral examples,...
Patrick Faigenbaum
Since the 1970s, Patrick Faigenbaum has developed a remarkable body of photographs that extend from intimate portraiture and still life to evocative meditations on contemporary urban experiences. He situates his work within the heart of the pictorial...
Rachel Berman: The Struggle with Self
An artist, poet, and humanist, Rachel Berman is foremost an observer of life. Berman's search to observe and paint others is, in fact, an exercise in introspection. As Berman explains, "the paintings are autobiographical ... they are about me, trying...
Richard III's Bones and the Glamour of Evil
Richard's durable reputation as a cheerful, endlessly resourceful schemer and murderer is to a considerable extent the very source of his fame in those reaches of popular culture influenced by historical legend. Laurence Olivier's sumptuous 1955 movie...
The Inscrutable Mystery of Faces
Whatever the reason, writers came to love the noble brow. They made brows into a characteristic element in literature. For decades books, good and bad, teemed with men and women whose brows were called admirable. Robert Burns, gazing at a portrait of...
The Next Thousand Years
This generation may be a little more sophisticated about the passing of a hundred years than were its forebears, just as reactions to the appearance of the once frightening comets have become almost nonchalant in our jaded age. Apart from its commercial...