Isaiah Berlin

Berlin, Sir Isaiah

Sir Isaiah Berlin, 1909–97, English political scientist, b. Riga, Latvia (then in Russia). His family moved to St. Petersburg when he was a boy and emigrated to London in 1921. He was educated at Oxford, where he became a fellow (1932), a professor of social and political theory (1957–67), and president of Wolfson College (1966–75). In The Hedgehog and the Fox (1953), Berlin explored Leo Tolstoy's view of irresistible historical forces, and in Historical Inevitability (1954) he attacked both determinist and relativist approaches to history as superficial and fallacious. His other works include Karl Marx (3d ed. 1963), Four Essays on Liberty (1969), Personal Impressions (1980), and the essay collection The Proper Study of Mankind (1997). He was knighted in 1957.

See his Letters, 1928–1946 (2004, ed. by H. Hardy); biographies by J. Gray (1996) and M. Ignatieff (1998).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

Isaiah Berlin: Selected full-text books and articles

Two Concepts of Liberty By Isaiah Berlin Clarendon Press, 1958
Isaiah Berlin's Russian Thinkers and the Argument for Inclusion By Mason, Addis Kritika, Vol. 13, No. 1, Winter 2012
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Concept of Liberty: The Polemic between the Neo-Republicans and Isaiah Berlin* By Coser, Ivo Brazilian Political Science Review, Vol. 8, No. 3, September 1, 2014
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Sociological Insights of Great Thinkers: Sociology through Literature, Philosophy, and Science By Christofer Edling; Jens Rydgren Praeger, 2011
Librarian's tip: Chap. 27 "Isaiah Berlin: On the Sociology of Freedom"
A Philosopher's Story By Morton Gabriel White Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999
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