Deportation of Illegal Aliens

deportation

deportation, expulsion of an alien from a country by an act of its government. The term is not applied ordinarily to sending a national into exile or to committing one convicted of crime to an overseas penal colony (historically called transportation). In international law the right to send an alien to the country to which he or she owes allegiance (or to any country that will accept him or her) derives from a government's sovereignty. In the United States, deportation is the responsibility of the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement of the Dept. of Homeland Security.

Except under the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 there was no American deportation law until the enactment in 1882 of a statute aimed at certain Chinese immigrants. The class of deportable aliens was subsequently enlarged several times, coming to include persons who before their entry into the United States were insane, feeble-minded, illiterate, or diseased in various ways. Many foreigners suspected of involvement in radical political activity were deported during the "Red Scare" of 1919. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 removed the statute of limitations on any kind of deportation.

The largest group of deported persons are those who have entered the country illegally. In the 1980s and 1990s expulsion of some of the numerous refugees from such Caribbean countries as Cuba and Haiti raised controversy. A deported alien cannot reenter the United States without special permission from the attorney general.

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2015, The Columbia University Press.

Deportation of Illegal Aliens: Selected full-text books and articles

Aftermath: Deportation Law and the New American Diaspora By Daniel Kanstroom Oxford University Press, 2012
National Insecurities: Immigrants and U.S. Deportation Policy since 1882 By Deirdre M. Moloney University of North Carolina Press, 2012
Institutional Overflow: Tales from Deported Children along the Border By Sanchez, Maria Eugenia Hernandez Journal of the Southwest, Vol. 51, No. 4, Winter 2009
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Burden of Deportation on Children in Mexican Immigrant Families By Dreby, Joanna Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 74, No. 4, August 2012
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
A Second Chance: The Right to Effective Assistance of Counsel in Immigration Removal Proceedings By Harvard Law Review, Vol. 120, No. 6, April 2007
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Normative and Historical Cases for Proportional Deportation By Banks, Angela M Emory Law Journal, Vol. 62, No. 5, January 1, 2013
Courtroom Access Principles Apply to Deportation Hearings By Olson, Kathleen K Newspaper Research Journal, Vol. 24, No. 1, Winter 2003
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
An Immigration Gideon for Lawful Permanent Residents By Johnson, Kevin R The Yale Law Journal, Vol. 122, No. 8, June 2013
Citizens, Strangers, and In-Betweens: Essays on Immigration and Citizenship By Peter H. Schuck Westview Press, 1998
Librarian’s tip: "The 'Civil' Nature of Deportation" begins on p. 34, and "Deportation and Due Process" begins on p. 62
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