Magazine article Insight on the News

Quid Pro Quo Getting Costly. (the Business)

Magazine article Insight on the News

Quid Pro Quo Getting Costly. (the Business)

Article excerpt

As the late Sen. Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Ill.) was fond of saying, "A billion here, a billion there and pretty soon you're talking about big money." Even before the first cruise missile has been fired at Baghdad, the United States is facing a bill running into the billions because of checkbook diplomacy in which the Bush administration has had to buy support for invading Iraq.

Washington saved a bundle in early March when the Turkish Parliament voted against allowing the United States to use Turkey to mount a northern front against Saddam Hussein. If it had voted "yes," the United States would have been obliged to cough up $26 billion in a complicated aid package. Of course it still may happen--despite the initial "no" vote, there remains a chance the Turks may effect a U-turn.

But Turkey aside, the dollar costs of arm-twisting diplomacy are increasing. In 2001, assistance in the "war on terrorism" earned Pakistan a $1 billion debt write-off, $100 million in immediate aid and the lifting of economic sanctions imposed by the Clinton administration when Islamabad tested a nuclear bomb.

Other key allies in the Middle East also are poised to cash in on this opportunity. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.