Magazine article Marketing

Networking Is like Marriage. It Is Socially Necessary, but It Causes a Great Deal of Grief

Magazine article Marketing

Networking Is like Marriage. It Is Socially Necessary, but It Causes a Great Deal of Grief

Article excerpt

Networking is like marriage. It is socially necessary, but it causes a great deal of grief "If the dons sight Devon, I'll quit the port of heaven And I'll drum them up the channel as we drummed them long ago."

Sir Henry Newbolt's verse is out of fashion in these degenerate days, but I am reminded of his poem, Drake's Drum, whenever I hear Harry Turner, managing director of TSW, proclaim the need for his station to remain independent, whatever convulsions the ITV system may undergo. Harry is a justly popular man, and I suspect most people instinctively feel sympathy for his case, but there is rather more doubt about the practical chances of a small station surviving the perils of franchise auctions, the possibilities of multiple bids and the much less protected climate which may exist after 1992.

Harry is, of course, well aware of these facts, but like the man in the poem, he places his trust in a supernatural agency arising at the last moment to save him -- the only difference being that instead of Francis Drake, Harry is relying on the intervention of George Russell, chairman designate of the ITC. Contractors such as TSW believe that from his base in London, Russell will create a system that protects the vulnerable parts of the ITV network.

"George is in his hammock, and a thousand miles away, Dreamin' all the time o' Plymouth Ho."

Well, perhaps so, but however good his intentions, and in spite of his abilities, Russell will face a number of intractable problems in trying to preserve TSW and Turner for posterity. One aspect of this, but a very important one, is the question of networking. Russell is on record as favouring the preservation of the ITV network, but the question is how this will be organised and who will pay the costs.

The trouble is that networking is like marriage. It may be socially necessary, but its aftermatch causes a great deal of grief. …

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