Magazine article Marketing

Coping with Cross-Cultural Recruitment

Magazine article Marketing

Coping with Cross-Cultural Recruitment

Article excerpt

Coping with cross-cultural recruitment UK marketing departments seeking foreign graduates for their skills, or to offset the dwindling supply of UK graduates, face a bewildering array of "recruitment cultures" on the Continent.

Last week, more than a dozen UK companies took part in a recruitment fair in Paris. Had they attemted the same recruitment exercise in West Germany, the event would have been quickly shut down -- such fairs are strictly illegal in West Germany's highly-regulated recruitment system.

In general, graduate recruitment in mainland Europe is more focused because, unlike UK practice, most university degrees are vocationally oriented. Marketing directors of mainland companies prefer to hire graduates who have studied marketing or business.

In France, for instance, most recruitment efforts are channelled through the universities. In addition to jobs fairs, companies develop contracts with marketing and business professors or with some of the student societies.

A high percentage of French students find jobs as a result of summer work placement programmes. Companies assign students to work on marketing projects from three to six months, which is usually long enough for each party to see how the other operates, according to Mark Kuhn of ATS Quest, a European graduate consultancy. …

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