Magazine article Nieman Reports

Words & Reflections

Magazine article Nieman Reports

Words & Reflections

Article excerpt

Is it possible for truth to exist in journalism? This question resides at the core of "The Press Effect: Politicians and the Stories That Shape the Political World," a book written by Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Paul Waldman. Seth Effron, who for 18 years reported on politics in and around North Carolina, reflects on how the analysis and conclusions contained in this book apply to current political coverage. In doing so, he relives President Bush's telegenic landing on the USS Abraham Lincoln and wonders why aspects of "truth" didn't surface in the political coverage of that event. He also comes up with a few good questions that most in the press never asked.

Mike Riley, editor of The Roanoke (Va.)Times, provides a close-up view of Eric Alterman's book, "What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News," but he also looks behind the words--liberal and conservative--that are tossed around in media food fights. Riley writes about how all of this affects journalists: "Journalists are held hostage by the power of labels. We, the labelers, have become the labeled, and we're trapped by the ways in which people perceive the words 'conservative' and 'liberal.' That's a terrible predicament for people who fancy themselves as independent observers."

Media companies believed in the Internet as a profit-making enterprise. And then they lost billions of dollars before abandoning this belief. In "Bamboozled at the Revolution: How Big Media Lost Billions in the Battle for the Internet," John Motavalli chronicles the many difficulties big media companies have had trying to develop new media strategies. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.