Magazine article Occupational Hazards

The Good Old Days

Magazine article Occupational Hazards

The Good Old Days

Article excerpt

Are the good old days of safety over?

Not all that many years ago, it wasn't uncommon for the position of safety director to be bestowed on a soon-to-retire foreman. After the daily grind of production, the safety job served as a fairly leisurely transition to life after a paycheck. Put up the new safety posters outside the cafeteria, make sure the storeroom is stocked with gloves, and offer a friendly ear to anyone who passed by your office.

If your job sounds distinctly different from that scenario, I'm not surprised. Today, more and more companies are looking for people who can handle safety, health, and environmental responsibilities. These varied duties are complex and knowledge-intensive. Formal training is a necessity. Trading on the way things have always been done won't work because the industrial world is constantly demanding more of its people and its technology. New laws, new regulations, new concerns about liability are forcing safety, health, and environmental pros to keep up, or be run over.

Taking a look at some employment ads recently, I was again struck by the diversity of skills that people in this field must possess, and the variety of tasks they must tackle. At a midwest research facility, the -help wanted- sign is out for someone who can oversee compliance with SARA, TSCA, Hazard Communication Standards, Prudent Laboratory Practices, OSHA regulations, and accident prevention/investigation and analysis.- Just so candidates are not misled into thinking they're destined for a life of leisure, the ad also notes that the company wants a 'strong communicator who is comfortable working with multiple priorities. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.