Magazine article Information Today

JICST/NTIS Conference on Japanese Information

Magazine article Information Today

JICST/NTIS Conference on Japanese Information

Article excerpt

JICST/NTIS Conference on Japanese Information

Approximately two hundred people attended the JICST/NTIS Conference on Japanese Scientific and Technical Information last month in Washington, DC. Sponsored by the National Technical Information Service of the U.S. Commerce Department and the Japanese Information Center of Science and Technology, the conference focused on accessing Japanese information. It was the largest conference of its kind ever held according to conference speaker Justin Bloom, a Japanese linguist and former diplomat who is now the President of Technology International.

Machine Translations

The biggest barrier to accessing Japanese information lies in language difficulties. To provide Japanese technical information, Fujitsu developed ScanFile, an online database translation system based on machine translation technology Atlas II (Automatic TransLAtion System).

ScanFile allows users without any knowledge of the Japanese language to retrieve Japanese database information using English keywords. By using machine translation, ScanFile translates Japanese database information into English in real time. When a more accurate translated text is required, ScanFile offers post-editing services by human translators. ScanFile will be available commercially in early 1992.

I searched the system for liquid crystal displays, published this year, in Korea. Two articles described production of such screens in South Korea and included the production runs for these products. Fujitsu found 34 articles for me. on laptop personal computers. We narrowed the search to 1991 and read translations about a NEC laptop with 100 megabytes, a 386 machine with OS/2 and the Japanese version of OS/2. I only read machine translations and did not see an example of the post-editing services by human translators, which are offered. When a sentence lacked a subject and was elliptical, it was shown by the expression [*s].

Disinformation

Allen Millsap of the National Science Foundation brought up the subject of disinformation. He had heard that a Japanese vendor would offer a gigabyte network, a computer network that could store files as large as a gigabyte, a billion words. The rumor turned out to be untrue. …

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