Magazine article Security Management

Home on the Page: WWW.Securitymanagement.Com

Magazine article Security Management

Home on the Page: WWW.Securitymanagement.Com

Article excerpt

Over the past seven and a half years, Security Management Online has connected readers to thousands of the industry's most important articles, white papers, surveys, reports, testimonies, forms, training tools, rulemakings, Web links, book chapters, and bills. While SM Online remains a vast repository of historical information, it is constantly being refreshed with the latest documents and supplementary materials. Here's a sample of some of the latest updates. Also, look for the @ symbol throughout the magazine for other references to materials on the Web site. And don't forget to check out www.asisonline.org for Society events and news.

Aviation security. Understandably enough, given the 9-11 hijackings and the subsequent anthrax attacks, U.S. antiterrorist forces have devoted significant attention and dollars to aviation security and weapons of mass destruction. But what happens when the two intersect? An article in the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, by Robert Raffel, senior director for public safety at the Orlando International Airport, addresses the most likely WMD threat to strike civil aviation: biological weapons. "While the consequence management roles of the federal agencies, firefighters, and local health authorities tend to be organized and frequently exercised," Raffel writes, "experts have scarcely studied the response to biological incidents within the framework of civil aviation." Who, he asks, would be responsible for quarantine of an aircraft? Players would likely include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local and state health authorities, who might have limited experience dealing with aviation authorities.

Thornier questions include, "In what ways can airlines reconfigure airplanes to defend against such threats?" Noting that civil aviation is "ill prepared" for this threat, Raffel calls for partnerships among civil aviation authorities, law enforcement, and public health officials. Airports should practice WMD response, agencies must revisit their standard operating procedures for consistency and conformity, and airline personnel should know what to do in case of a biological event. SM Online has the article.

Evacuations. Most building evacuation procedures are dictated by local fire and building codes. Perhaps lesser known is that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has evacuation requirements of its own. According to OSHA, companies must have an "evacuation action plan" if they have (or are required to have) fire extinguishers and if anyone will be evacuating during an emergency. This document must include such information as evacuation procedures and emergency escape-route assignments and procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate. The only exemption is for companies at which every employee is trained and equipped to fight fires. With that in mind, OSHA has made available an online "eTool" to help "small, low-hazard service, or retail businesses implement an emergency action plan, and comply with OSHA's emergency standards."

Among areas covered are design and construction requirements for exit routes, fire detection systems, alarms, and portable fire extinguishers. Some nonmandatory guidelines are offered as well. For example, OSHA recommends that alarms exceed the ambient noise level by at least six decibels, and that the light intensity for visual alarms be at least 75 candelas (a measure of luminous intensity). Navigate the eTool via SM Online. …

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