Magazine article ADWEEK

Sticky Business Clicks with Teens

Magazine article ADWEEK

Sticky Business Clicks with Teens

Article excerpt

A magazine campaign in late 2002 succeeded in breathing new life into Polaroid's I-Zone pocket camera, which allows the user to create mini snapshots in seconds. The campaign, from Chicago's Starcom and sister creative agency Leo Burnett, set out to boost film sales by making the product cool again among the Britney Spears set.

The agency convinced Polaroid to roll out a highly targeted campaign that would use some off-the-wall creative techniques to appeal to the i-Zone's core user, girls aged 15 to 17. The agency spent $1.1 million on ads in the November and December 2002 editions of four magazines catering to teenage girls.

The agency knew two things going in: that teens respond to messages that are witty and entertaining while rejecting corporate, hard-sell messages, and that teenage girls love stickers.

Thus, the creative concept of "hijacking" was born. Through the ads, Polaroid demonstrated how a quirky image taken with an i-Zone "sticky pie"--film with an adhesive backing that lets a photo become a sticker--can change, editorialize and satirize whatever it gets stuck to. Within magazines were inserted sheets of stickers mimicking i-Zone photos of such random subjects as a monkey, a man's hairy chest and a close-up of someone's big, toothy grin. The sheers appeared alongside "fake" ads that encouraged readers to peel the stickers and place them on the ads. Hardly a stiff, corporate approach.

The ad copy read: "i-Zone sticky pies. For sticking, i-Zone pocket cameras. For clicking. …

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