Magazine article Curriculum Review

Legislative Processes Aren't Always Polite, Student Learns

Magazine article Curriculum Review

Legislative Processes Aren't Always Polite, Student Learns

Article excerpt

It's common for civics-minded teachers to encourage student involvement in the political process by mounting campaigns in favor of feel-good legislation naming official state animals, plants and the like. Such was the case when 9-year-old Will Smith led his East Silver Spring Elementary class in encouraging Maryland legislators to proclaim walking the state's "official exercise."

After two years of lobbying, the bill passed and made its way to the governor's office for the signature that would give it the force of law, the AP reports. But then Gov. Robert Ehrlich, perhaps wanting to make a point about governmental priorities during difficult times, did something unexpected: He vetoed the bill. "It serves no public purpose," Ehrlich contended. Young Mr. Smith of Silver Spring didn't enjoy the outcome, but he'll carry an important lifetime lesson from the process just the same. lemons. Soak the paper towels in the juice. Start with a small rolled piece of toweling, then a coin, followed by a piece of foil. Continue to layer the three materials, filling the tube and ending with a coin. Tape a second stripped wire to the coin.

Moisten a fingertip on each hand and touch the ends of the two wires. (Students will experience a small shock or tingle but it will be very harmless. Students may also try attaching a light bulb to each end of the battery. The battery will be weak, but the bulb may have a faint glow.)

This is a wet cell, the parent of today's battery. …

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