Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Silent Strokes Increase Odds of Devastating Events Later On: Newly Identified Risk Factors

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Silent Strokes Increase Odds of Devastating Events Later On: Newly Identified Risk Factors

Article excerpt

HONOLULU -- The presence of an asymptomatic cerebral infarct increases the likelihood that a patient will have a major debilitating stroke sometime within the next year by 8%-12%, Dr. James M. Gebel reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology.

That finding comes from a posthoc analysis of patient data from the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis Study (ACAS), which was headquartered at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C. Blinded neuroradiologists read entry and exit CT scans from the 1,236 patients in the study for whom there were complete data. The patients--all of whom were asymptomatic and had at least 60% carotid stenosis at study entry--were followed for up to 5 years, with a mean of 2.7 years.

After investigators controlled for known risk factors, two factors emerged as significantly increasing the odds of clinical stroke during follow-up.

The first, having both diabetes and hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol greater than 240 mg/dL), resulted in an odds ratio of 3.0 for patients with clinical stroke. The second, having had a prior cerebral infarct, resulted in an odds ratio of 1.7 for clinical stroke, said Dr. Gebel of the University of Pittsburgh.

Several other factors significantly increased the chance of a patient developing a new cerebral infarct during follow-up. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.