Magazine article Occupational Hazards

We Can Do It: Protecting Women Workers

Magazine article Occupational Hazards

We Can Do It: Protecting Women Workers

Article excerpt

Perhaps one of the most powerful iconic images of the 20th Century is the poster of Rosie the Riveter, who symbolized all the women who entered the work force during WWII. These women became the backbone of the U.S. manufacturing industry after millions of men enlisted in the armed forces.

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They entered a workplace that was created for men. The machinery was sized to fit the length of men's arms and legs; the clothing was sized to fit men's bodies; and the personal protective equipment was sized to fit men's heads, hands and feet.

Sixty years later, some employers are still coming to terms with the fact that there are special occupational safety and health issues for women.

In the following articles, Linda Tapp, Lyn Penniman and Belinda Thielen discuss safety and health hazards women face in the manufacturing, healthcare and laundry industries and what can be done to make those industries safer for women workers in particular and all workers in general. …

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