Magazine article Sunset

Move on Up: Carve into the Attic for a Home Office, Bathroom, and Extra Sleeping Space

Magazine article Sunset

Move on Up: Carve into the Attic for a Home Office, Bathroom, and Extra Sleeping Space

Article excerpt

If your home feels cramped, look overhead. There may be hidden potential in the attic, despite angular spaces and low clearances created by dormers and sharply sloping ceilings. "Remodeling an attic is like building a boat: You have to be creative in utilizing every available inch," says Seattle architect Gary Epstein. Here is an example of his work that charts some of the possibilities.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

At first glance, Molly and Kevin LaChapelle's Redmond, Washington, attic didn't look like it had much promise: no floors, walls, or windows--only large ducts, insulation, roof rafters, and ceiling joists.

Epstein was challenged to create a space that functioned as a craft room for Molly, a kids' sleepover spot, and a home office for Kevin. He put Molly's area--a desk-height work surface built under a low, sloped ceiling--where the minimal clearance is most comfortable for someone sitting down. Skylights flood the counter with natural light; underneath is a long, shallow storage area that's perfect for long bolts of fabric. Nearby, a very large duct could not be moved, so Epstein built bunk beds over it for the kids. …

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