Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

School-Age Aggression Increases over Time; Students Become Less Likely to Target Property: Rethinking TOCA-R Scale. (Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Revised)

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

School-Age Aggression Increases over Time; Students Become Less Likely to Target Property: Rethinking TOCA-R Scale. (Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Revised)

Article excerpt

WASHINGTON -- School children are more likely to be aggressive toward other students than toward property, and with time, aggression toward property tends to decrease, and interpersonal aggression to increase, Kimberly T. Kendziora, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the Society for Prevention Research.

Both types of aggression were more intense in boys than in girls but no more common.

Those were some of the findings from a longitudinal study of 1,196 children enrolled at 19 Baltimore public schools. The children were randomly assigned to either receive an intervention designed to boost their academic achievement or to be in a control group.

Because they had not undergone any intervention, the behavior of the 640 children in the control group was considered to be reflective of the natural history of aggression.

Three hundred twenty of the control group were boys and 63% were African American; average age at the beginning of first grade was 6.3 years. They were followed with serial testing from first through seventh grade, said Dr. Kendziora, a senior research analyst at the Pelavin Research Center of the American Institutes for Research, Washington.

The test used was the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Revised (TOCA-R), which consists of 10 questions about how the children behave in class. …

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