Magazine article Occupational Hazards

Emergency Response: Are Emergency Responders Willing and Able to Respond?

Magazine article Occupational Hazards

Emergency Response: Are Emergency Responders Willing and Able to Respond?

Article excerpt

Arecent study of 5,000 healthcare-based emergency responders such as doctors, nurses and EMTs uncovered some interesting facts. Many hospitals have no idea if their workers are able to respond to an emergency situation (trained to an emergency response plan) or even if they are willing to respond to an emergency.

According to researcher Robyn Gershon, MHS, DRPH, a professor at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, one-third of the responders surveyed were married to another responder; 54 percent were responsible for the care of children; and 27 percent said they were responsible for the care of elderly relatives.

Gershon, speaking on Oct. 30 at the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2003 (NOIRS) in Pittsburgh, said her findings indicated responders had barriers to their ability to respond to an emergency, as well as barriers to their willingness to respond.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

All in all, said Gershon, workers said their ability to respond would be limited by: transportation (32 percent); care of children (30 percent); personal health (5 percent); care of elderly relatives (11 percent0; and pet care (5 percent). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.